This page is created by a Deaf blogger and is NOT intended to offend Deaf community, Deaf individuals, or anyone else. Any hateful or offensive comments made by individual readers is the sole responsibility of that person. With the exception of news sources (I do not own them), these blog articles are my own opinions and thoughts with which you may disagree. I do remove comments that only contain profanity and insults about me or this page (it's my blog). If your comment goes unpublished for no other reason, it may be mistakenly filtered as spam.

Saturday, November 3, 2012

Reasons Employers Won't Hire Deaf People

When you apply for job online, you usually find the statement somewhere on the career section site that says "We don't discriminate against persons with regard to gender, sexual orientation, race, disability, etc...". The reality is something else when an employer find out job applicant is deaf, they look for excuses not to hire that person. They are very good at talking around the issue simply because they don't want to be sued. As far as they know about a law especially the ADA (American with Disabilities Act), they can just say they hired someone else that is more qualified than the deaf applicant in fear of being sued. They can be real sneaky about it.

The real reason the employers refuse to hire deaf applicants is because they are not willing to pay for a sign language interpreter to interview with a deaf applicant. They do not want to pay for working with the hired deaf applicant for few days with an interpreter to settle into the job during training period. The interpreters charge employers $75 to $125 or even higher per hour. The employers do not want to waste their money on interpreters if deaf employees don't last longer on the jobs. It's sad but true.

Put yourself in the shoes of those employers, what would you do if you have to choose between a qualified deaf applicant and qualified hearing applicant? If you really don't want to spend any money on a job applicant for any reasonable accommodations, you would go with the able-bodied applicant. If you can't handle or are unsure what to do with a deaf person, you would feel more comfortable to go with the hearing one.

Another reason is the communication difficulty and telephone culture. Employers may not hire the deaf applicants if they are only relying on sign language and not able to use speech communication with other hearing employees and supervisors. The employers who work in a fast-paced environment may not have time to write the notes back and forth between them and deaf employees. Employers highly value verbal communication in understanding and feedback among employees, especially involved with paying clients and customers. Most companies are revolved around telephoning people all the times. Deaf applicants do not hear well on the telephone and would have to relay on the emailing on the company computers to communicate with someone. Employers want instant feedback by telephone and do not always have time to read hundreds of emails a day from other people. 

Obviously, it is wrong to deny deaf applicants the opportunity to seek employment with companies and it's also wrong to deny them the opportunity to demonstrate their skills and experiences to employers. Deaf people are capable to do everything except hear. There are other better ways to communicate like emailing or texting with employees. However, when they hire a deaf person, it's because of the tax credits or because she or he must possess special abilities or skills that hearing applicant doesn't have.

If you are deaf and still waiting for someone to hire you, you are wasting your time. Especially in today's economy, this is going to take a long time for you to either get back on track or get your first job. There are millions of unemployed people in the United States, so it would be harder to compete against the hearing ones. If you are still working with vocational rehabilitation or state employment services, don't count on them because they are always finding you stocking or other low paying jobs. As hard as it is, you would have to be really aggressive to find a good paying job. 

Instead of just being a job hunter, you can do something you really enjoy. If you have a degree in graphic design, you can start a little business to design logos for your clients. 
Market your skills to potiental clients on social networking sites like twitter or facebook. You can also create your LinkedIn account to connect with the right people. If you are really a good photographer, you can start selling photos to greeting card companies like Hallmark. There are many things you can do as long as you have a passion for what you do. I'm sure you have a lot of great ideas to start a new career even if you don't have a college degree!

Check out the new ebook, "What Every Deaf Person Needs to Know", at https://sarahterras.selz.com

Please like https://facebook.com/DeafUnemployment

160 comments:

  1. The company employers or any professional department like doctor, dentist as you name it that they can get tax write off. If they hire more deaf people, they company can get grant from government will help for deaf people's access need like an interpreter, videophone device, light alarm, and so on. Employers may be ignorant or oblivious. They needed to get an educate to understand how it works. If they knew, they would hire deaf people easily. You are right deaf people can do anything except can't hear.

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    1. Hi Anonymous,

      Absolutely, in my state, Vocational Rehabilitation Services do provide interpreters for job interviews. However, the VR said once deaf applicants were hired, employers would have to pay for interpreters on the job training and whatever accessibility deaf employers may need. Probably, the state or city where you live in may be different from where I live. Apparently, the law may varies city to city or state to state.

      If it wasn't for the tax credit, would they still have hired us? That's an interesting question, isn't?

      Yes, I wish all companies and small businesses would at least be educated about deaf culture and deaf people's rights. Also, it would definitely be nice if all people learn ASL.

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    2. Tax credit will not work. They dont want to do paperwork!

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    3. Cuz hearing people are very lacking lazy not want do paperwork hearing people is stupid, idiots, and duh. F**k hearing people! Deaf Power!!! Sorry for being rude cuz it piss me off.

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    4. If you are reading this in the state of Missouri, vr pays an agency to help you find a job. The agency pays for interpreters for the interview, all training, and will continue to be there until you reach 90 days employment.

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    5. Employers aren't lazy or don't know, it's more they can't afford interpreters. Many business especially small business do not have money to spare. A business exists to make money. Instead of blaming hearing people why not learn how business works and start your own instead of sit back and wait for hearing to hand it all to you.

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    6. You are absolutely right. I have always encouraged all of them to start their own business. I am already starting my own business. That's how we can build our own economy.

      Excepting employers to provide you with an ASL interpreter isn't going to get you anywhere.

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    7. Also I did applied a job but my mom won't let me get job. I am frustration with my mom. I still consider plan move to the states and find a VR will help me to find a job. I hope so.

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    8. Wow always a poor me attitude. Interesting. And a blame game.

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    9. I think a good idea would be for employers to have someone on the job that knows sign language. Example would be if a hospital has an ADA person that person should be able to sign as one of their responsibilities. Interpreters charge too much money..period. There are people who sign very well and can comunicate with the Deaf. Plus being in the same buisness they would understand the job.

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    10. Having an unqualified interpreter who " knows sign" can be a liability, especially at the hospital. If there's a misunderstanding, that person who "knows sign" could be held accountable, as well as the hospital, for the lack of proper access to communication.

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    11. There should be a law against not hiring the handicap when their application shows that they are well qualified or just plain qualified to do the job or any job and truly something other than stock.

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    12. That is true story. Some hearing people just doesn't want to hire any deaf people is that they are afraid to comminucate with deaf person or don't want to understand their culture as they thought that all deaf people can't do anything. They are an idiot idea or they might be afraid to fail. They doesn't understand and also they just lack of communicate with Deaf as they think that Deaf people are ignorment or stupid. No that is not true!!! All deaf people from around the world are having some skills and education good as the same as hearing people as WE all are human being.
      Also I applied a job for bakery at Superstore in Windsor, NS. The manager called my huband as she found out that i am a deaf person. and said " Oh i will call back in a few days" Then she did called asked some questions, if i have asthma problem? i said oh not really serious but just got rid of my coughing, is all. Then she said" i can't hire me because they do make the flour to mixing and it is no good for a person with asthma". I knew she makes an good excuse and don't wanted to hire me cause i am DEAF person. My husband pissed off at her and said that was Discrimanted. She denied it. So we never even bother her and just let her go fucking herself. I am still struggling to find a good job for years.. It frustrated me.

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    14. Im an engineering and that statement above is half bullshit excuses, my company do provide interpreter for all meetings thence they pay it off then claim it as tax write off. They prefer writing much off than paying Government in taxes. There is a way around but you need to tell them its a tax write off if you hire interpreter. What I notice as far as I know, Most deafies prefer playing around and collecting SSDI and be fucking lazy is all they wanna do. Deaf power doesn't mean shit nowadays!! Get your head outta your ass and do something with your life and maybe Employer will see positive perspective about deaf people.

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    15. For those of you saying that deaf ppl have a "poor me" attitude...I have to say, IF you were deaf I'm sure you would feel a little different about this subject. I have a deaf son who tries his hardest to get a job, he found jobs, but it was never a high end job. He has been mainstreamed all through school and had an 3.85 GPA, was a state wrestler, all American football player and graduated with scholarships, but yet still no one will give him a chance to prove he can do it. Before you THINK that these deaf people are "feeling sorry for themselves" and should "try harder", try living in their shoes!!! It's not easy. I'm ashamed that you people who say these things are a part of society! Most of these kids DO try and are not lazy when it comes to looking for jobs.

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    16. In response to the last comment.

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  3. i dont know why people say this because every deaf person i know got jobs..good jobs being VR couneslors...group home workers...employees for deaf schools

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    1. Anonymous #2

      VR counselors, advisors, social workers, teachers and staff for deaf schools are "safe" jobs for deaf people because they can only use ASL to communicate with their deaf clients and deaf students in their workplaces.

      In regards to "Employers Won't Hire Deaf People" article, I was only referring to HEARING employers for HEARING companies who do not want to hire deaf people to work for them. It's all about verbal communication issue.

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  5. Fair enough. Im dispointed to say it but its the same in the UK for a number of disabilities.

    Organisations big and small, charities you feel should know better, theyre all playing at the discrimination game 'in a pefect world we could do it but this isnt a perfect world, so we wont - note the choice of the word 'wont'.

    If any of you work out how to jolly this imperfect world along. Let me know!!

    Chloe

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    1. Chloe,

      I am not surprised deaf discrimination occurs in other countries as well, unfortunately. I am writing more articles about the best way to overcome discrimination and what we must do to stop it. I'll be sure to let you know!

      STerras

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  7. I agree with some of the posting. But, I can't complain anyway. I remember there was a part-time that I can work relatively on my own was: Newspaper Carrier. No supervisor will watch me while deliver the newspaper. :-)

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    1. Only problem with that is it doesn't pay enough for a living wage and eventually newspapers will be shut down. Some newspapers have changed to completely 100% online. Sad.

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  8. I am an advocate for DHH in the state of Washington. I don't think the job situation needs to be as bleak as you make it out to be. Good communication skills are always key to getting a good job, and many employees are looking to hire disabled people if they show a good attitude and have training for the job. I worked for years in the hearing world because I have strong English skills and was not afraid to use a pen and paper when I had to. I never relied on terps. If you cannot speak, make a business portfolio in a binder and show your work, letters of recommendation, certifications, and photos of you in training or at another job. Let the portfolio do the talking when you interview. Also, communications in the office is largely by text and email now. Deaf can and should use text technology to their advantage. Explain to the boss how you could use texting and email to help you communicate on the job. Good jobs are out there for DHH. You have to be persistent and have a good attitude.

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    1. Thank you for your insight. As I am assuming that DHH is the human services that you work in, it really depends on job. If deaf people want to work in human services, they have a higher chance of getting a job than they would get if it was in a different department.

      Health and Human services are parts of government system, so they can't discriminate against people with disabilities.

      As for communication, a lot of jobs are fast paced environment, therefore employers only rely on verbal communication. That's why they regard deafness as a lack of communication. Not that it's okay--that's discrimination--but it's happening all the times unfortunately.

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    2. Out of curiosity, my guess is that DHH does stand for Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Isn't that correct? From what I understand is that here in WA State does have ODHH (Office for Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Just wondering. :-) By the way, I have chatted with lots of Deaf / HH people (mostly in 40's) during last several months regarding their experience with job searching. Very frustrating. OFC, they were willing to communicate with interviewers in many ways; unfortunately, most of interviewers didn't hire them even thou they are qualified. Sadly, most of them started to hate hearing people when they are around them. Wow! I encouraged them not to but can educate them. *sigh* Just the saying. Thxs.

      By the way, I want to remind the Advocator for DHH that everyone is different. Keep that in mind.

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    3. Thank you for clearing that up. I wasn't familiar with DHH, but now I understand what it stands for.

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    4. Remember ODHH has a staff who signs throughout the office, so that falls under ASL friendly environments like deaf schools or advocacy programs. Employment for people with a sensory loss, deafness in our case is very low. Having a good attitude about it is very taxing, anyone who says they can do that, or they did that, great, more power to you. With a comment like that sounds like everybody has to have that personality. Guess what, after years of looking for employment, trying to survive, paying what we can, and dealing with the red tape with social services is no easy task. Getting up in the morning to do it all again to push on is an accomplishment. One more thing, economically within the workforce is very bad from the big corporations to the littlest taco truck. Doesn't hurt to be creative about finding ways to accommodate prospective employers in raising funds to help you excel in the workplace. Research, public libraries has computers with internet, knowledge is power, use it!

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  9. I have been deaf since birth. I used to communicate thru sign language when I was younger because I was in a deaf school in south Florida. However, now at 42. I am blessed that I can communicate orally but time has changed since most systems are gone because the government thinks we can live without them. My hearing is bad and without a good hearing aid I cannot hear what I need. Now, communication is what hearing people thinks the deaf needs to have when most cannot hear what is being said in the first place. I am still having difficulties getting work when I did had jobs. Central Florida area and most areas are lacking funds to help them. I have gotten run arounds and thinking of leaving soon. In all, its reality! So sad!

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    1. How nice of you to want to give an opportunity to deaf people.

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    2. This is Rachel, I dont appreciated your using my picture on facebook for your "deafcantgetjob.blogspot.com" and I want it removed please, and please do it as soon as possible... cuz I hate the grapevines spreading rumors that I dont have a job. Thank You.

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    3. Hi, Rachel, I saw your picture on Facebook for share on my friend's post. So I'd click a share. Your picture not on Facebook, it's picture of "warning deaf and proud of it" on yield sign. Just happened it's auto by itself for any pictures. I noticed it, I just let you know about it.

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    5. It was automatic. To everyone, if you don't want your picture all over Facebook, just don't put your photo on your own blog because whenever I share my blog on Facebook, your picture is just automatically linked to it. Nothing I could do about it no matter how many times I tried to remove the picture.

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  11. This article and all heartfelt comments should be forwarded to President Obama on the daily discrimination DHH & others go through to live an honorable life. I am a mother of a DHH, I know the sacrifices and awareness to produce to the public, knowledge of the subject. A L O T of human beings are idolized to self & turn their hearts on the urgency. My son's wife is also DHH. Their son is not DHH, he is their right & left arm, God planed this through his LOVE, I am grateful for His grace. My prayer`s will continue, that a "change will come" ~~~ ALL KEEP the FAITH !!!

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  12. Many time I had interview in various company. Human Resource office, they tends to say 'you are overqualified" as excuse that they don't want hire deaf. I tired of HR for bad excuse "overqualified" in Los Angeles. I don't like L.A suck.

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  13. Wow, yeah, I have seen some deaf people not able to get his/her job what he/she wants to work. I still don't understand how the employer handle to make determine to hire or not hire the deaf. I want share with you of my longest working. I am profoundly deaf and my job is structural revit model/drafter, senior drafter and designer. I have been continuously working with structural firm since Jan 2004 and by late 2009, we had downsizing and I was worried since I have said bye or our team drafters as they are layoff and only me and other three are keep after 6-10 were layoff. Then later in 2010, the structural firm was sold and merged with other company and my friendly project manager warned me about hope keep me. Then wow, the new structural firm hired me as new employee under new company name. Wow, I am still here and the company allowed me to get learn using Revit (3D) model. They still be happy communicate with me by email and write on papers. We have no problems so far. The president of structural firm said I am the best revit and drafters out of 25 drafters. He wants keep me and not want to see me to leave because he can't stand without me. I know this is rarely to heard about my story. Thanks.

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  14. For myself, I do not need an interpreter for daily work, only they can afford $35 to $100 for just once, an interview, that's it. They have enough $$, huh! In reality, I have seen plenty of asshole employers lying to my face on the phone... Deafs can use VP to communicate to their hearing clients or customers, I guess they(hearings) are so bloody SLOW to understand their(deafs) ambitions.. For Rachel Kolve, better call them,"hearing and hyporite" Instead of them calling us, "deaf and dumb" does it makes sense??

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  15. I am very interested to hear that employers are obligated to pay for interpreting costs.

    In New Zealand, we have what is called a job support fund which is capped at $16,900 per year and this covers the costs of interpreters for staff meetings - not only for Deaf people but for all people with disabilities as this covers their cost of disability.

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  16. It's TRUE! That's why, I do on my own business in Rios Remodelng for 12 years. I am enjoying work by myself and sometime, I hire to deaf work with me for my need help or long term...
    Please visit at www.RiosRemodeling.com, thank you!

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  17. If i may add my two cents...
    If someone who really really wants a job, how hard did they really work to obtain it? Looking for a career is not only a full time job, but one has to be on top of thier game, have anone considered adjusting thier resumes to fit the job they were seeking? Has anyone gone to a networking meeting in which you knew a prospective employer is looking to meet potential hires? Unfortunatly, during this day and age of Job Prospects, its not longer WHAT you know, but WHO you know!!!

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    1. You are correct. Its who you know and not just what you know. However, even those who do know you can became reluctant to hire you because of your deafness. Its an additional hurdle to overcome.

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  18. It also depends on the agency providing the Interpreters on the fee to perspective employers. One agency in the Middle Tn area providers Interpreters for fist time job interviews for free.

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  19. Why not work for the State or Federal Government? I worked for the Federal Government. I just retired in Jan 2013. Worked 37 long years at one agency! You must have good English skills. I used emails at all time! I had videophone in my office. Must have a good attitude! I refused to complain in my office to co workers. Yes my co workers took advantage of me, but I was glad to have some work. I had to take some training at my work. Sometimes I got the interpreters for the classes. Sometimes I take online training with cc. My title of job was the Information Technology Specialist. I worked as a web manager, took care of property system, credit card holder and did many small jobs. I didn't stay one department. I moved to 5 different departments. I learned how to use the frontpage, dreamweaver, ms visual studio and photoshop. Had to learn how to use the property information system for my department.

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  20. Most Federal agencies will provide sign language interpreters or captioning. There are a lot of deaf people working for Federal agencies in the DC area. But if the deaf person does not have good English skills, then it is very hard.

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  21. It's too true. I am a computer professional with over 10 years experience. So far employers have been hiring hearing people with less experience and skills than I do, which is frustrating. I was lucky to have had my previous job which I got through an internship. When I was hired by my supervisor (now retired), he was told by other staff "You're crazy, how are you going to communicate with him?". He told me this before he retired I was so grateful for him taking a bold step in hiring me. BTW, I can speak English pretty well and also use ASL in my everyday life. It doesn't matter if you can speak English well hearing people still hesitate to hire deaf or hard of hearing people.

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  22. they are hard to new jobs but they hearing don,t understand and don,t know deaf people so have deaf people have good hand and work force not talk but hearing make too not force and too much talk other people hearing so not fair some boss don,t know and don,t understand about deaf people done good jobs there

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  23. USA HAS DISABILITY ACT THAT GOVERNMENTS AND SERVICES SHOULD PAY FOR INTERPRETING. SAME WITH CANADA FOR HUMAN RIGHT ACT.
    OTHERWISE YOU WITH YOUR RIGHTS CAN FILE HUMAN RIGHT TRIBUNAL AGAIN.

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  24. I am hard of hearing, wearing hearing aids (profound deaf w/o HA), 54 years old, Arlington, Texas. Laid off in September 2011 and looking for a job almost 2 years. I asked DARS to help me to find. NONE. I kept all these companies record in my Excel database who rejected or none to reply. I will send this to EEOC and NAD to review my list for evidence. I hope EEOC and NAD will sue these companies who denied to hire deaf/Hard of hearing to work. I urged you to do the same.

    Today world is stink and I really HATE online application. These are full of scam!

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  25. I'm having a heck of a time trying to find work that I am qualified in. I'm hard of hearing and wear HA but w/o them I am mostly deaf unless you speak directly into my ear.

    What I find very discouraging is I get the interview and I come in and all is good till I ask them to repeat something because I either didn't hear it correctly or misheard something, it's almost like hearing Apu from the Simpsons saying non-chalantly, "Thank you, come again".

    I'm looking to move to Boston to start school and I am already dreading Skyping for interviews as well as phone interviews because I don't hear that well on the phone and I've been told my hearing impairment betrays me on the phone. However, I will be damned if I have to work at a low-end job when I am know I am highly qualified for better job. Don't mean to sound bourgeois but I'm tired of working at entry level jobs when I have the degrees and know-how to do something better.

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  26. Deaf, in general, have a strong sense of entitlement. Many large companies in my area used to exclusively hire deaf before there were any laws. The deaf demanded so much and threatened so many lawsuits that the companies stopped hiring deaf. It wasnt the communication that was the issue, it was poor work performance and the endless demands.

    Another comment I would like to make is you must have marketable skills. If you sit around your house collecting SSI expecting some social agency to find work, then you ate expecting someone else to do your work. I know many well educated deafies who found their own work and have very few issues. If an employer sees you as angry, they will not want to hire you.

    My point is: Are you sure it is the deafness keeping you from getting a job? Maybe its just you.

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    1. I have been dealing with stupid & ignorant people my whole life, but this is just the dumbest statement I have ever heard.

      Are you trying to pin the blame on deaf people? Do you have a grudge against them? Seriously?

      The reason I allow your comment to be published is because I want to show the readers just how ignorant people really are out there.

      It's funny how some people like you are so quick to judge deaf people. Maybe you are the reason that keeps deaf people from getting a job.

      Thanks for the good laugh.

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    2. He's correct in some ways. There was one company here that used to hire deaf people but they shut it down and sold the unit because the deaf people were stealing the funds and having sex on the job (naturally they were fired). The person who ran the unit said he was not going to hire deaf people after that debacle. He said the tax write offs were a headache to work with. Also that comment he said about deaf people getting ssi expecting the social agencies to help..it's sadly true here in Wichita, KS. They prefer to not do the work or they truly don't know how to look for a job.

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    3. The problem I have with his statement is not about some Deaf people stealing money or having bad attitude with interviewers. It's about the comment he made directly to me & the general deaf people based on his observation that we are all the same. It was unfair that he was painting all of us in the same brush.

      So, do yourselves a favor, think before you write so that I won't think you're stupid.

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    4. What the anonymous coward above said was a grain of truth (the entitlement part), wrapped in a lie (the demanding part), concluding with a general statement pointing the blame back at us. It is a classic non-arguement and I take issue with it.
      I was hearing until my thirties. An accident took all that away. It took six years of searching for a regular job doing some literally back breaking work. Shovels were involved. It took several years after that of convincing the company I work for that I could do the math and run their inventory. In the meantime I saw people who were hired after I was get promoted quicker.
      I consider myself honorary deaf. My eyes, and the eyes of my family, were opened to another world. Having been on both sides of the fence, hearing and deaf, I say this to the hearing world in general and the man(?) who won't sign his name. The reason we deaf are demanding equal treatment is because there is an inequality built into the system. Businesses can opt out and say they hired someone more qualified, but let me ask you this: How many deaf people do you know in managerial positions? I did work my way up to a department manager position. The job was literally stacked against me. The position required I carry and answer a phone. It was also required that I answer public address systems and pages. It got to the point where it didn't matter how well I managed the inventory, I was demoted back to a receiving position. This job isn't beneath me or anyone, but the deaf are relegated to the category of second class citizens. Seen, but not heard. The only thing missing from the original post was the word 'uppity'.
      Now, to my fellow deaf brethren, do not mistake hearing people as evil malicious bigots out to harm you. They are merely stupid ignorant idiots. Stupid people can be useful if you take the time to teach them. Some take longer to convince than others. You have a mind, don't play the hearing world's game. Go out into the world and do what you want. Each person is different. If you want to know what I'm doing, come read my blog. My 'Clark Kent' job is being a receiver. If you can't tell by this post, I am a writer. When I started my job, all the training material was not captioned. I started asking for transcripts of the videos and pointing out the ways they are not meeting the ADA laws. They didn't like that, but embarrassment it beats a lawsuit. I wouldn't say it was me that got them to change, but perhaps I was of some influence.
      My book, Travellers Road, is up on Amazon as an e-book for one dollar. Check out the reviews. I didn't ask these folks to post, but I'm glad they did. Next month I'll be meeting with several people and getting my book into to the next stage where it will definitely cost more than a buck. (The first one is always free.)
      My advice here is to create. Build. Design. Paint. You are not the deaf construction worker. You are the builder who just so happens to be deaf. My hearing loss does not define me. You must re-define what it means to be deaf.

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    5. What a great post it is! Hat off to you.

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    6. Thank you. I have been known to post short stories on my blog in addition to the big things I have in the works.
      Here's a link to my online book. http://www.amazon.com/Travelers-Road-ebook/dp/B00AYFKCLS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1367441207&sr=1-1&keywords=travelers+road

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    7. Good Question. I do not know about any other person but my personal history. I Started trying to guess what was being said by picking up the very few words that were being spoken. Why. Because of the Abusive sarcastic remarks that I kept hearing, No body wants to repeat themselves. You can see over a short period of time them getting more and more irritated at dealing with you. The failure to Hear what a person has asked you to do, You getting reamed out for not doing Job. All the time these people full aware you are hard of hearing, Yet they will not speak up to make sure you are aware of what is needing to be done. People walking by you and telling you something and you never even knowing they were there. The having the audacity to blatantly scream back at you what ! or you deaf or something. You look around and everybody in the plant is staring at you. I personally would like to know if any other disability is treated so sarcastically if any other person is as abused as a bad as hard of hearing people are?

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    8. I have 2 brothers that are deaf and a sister who is hard-of-hearing. They act like everyone owes them, because of their disability. I know not all deaf people are that way. Yet a deaf person posted hearing people are stupid, idiots, etc.. He didn't say, "Some hearing people are stupid, idiots, etc." you didn't jump down his throat. I take offense to that! I grew up with the deaf and hh, so I know how much they are discriminated against. Yet I've seen and heard many of them discriminate against the hearing by saying all of us are dumb or stupid or whatever! So it goes both ways!

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    9. Deaf discriminates against hearing? Aw, boo hoo. LOL.

      Delete
  27. I've experienced for 6 months trying to find a job and knowing they were afraid to hire me or find excuses not to hire me. Finally, I got fed up and decided not to mention I was deaf. I sent an application over email to one employer and she responded, asking me to come interview with her. I emailed her back to set up an appointment and you know what? I didn't even ask for an interpreter. I just went in there at the front desk (I'm a graphic designer) and told the woman that I'm here. I sat, waited, and my boss came up to me, surprised to learn that I'm deaf. She took me to a room and told me she'll get her ceo's wife to come and interpret for me since she knows sign language very well. I was surprised and fortunate. Also, they tried other ways to communicate with me besides sign language like typing on a keyboard with a projector on the wall you can see what everyone is saying and taking turns using the keyboard. I showed them my portfolio and they were impressed and told me they'll contact me in a week. Then I was hired later... and still working for my employer for almost 8 years. So from my experience, sometimes you have to think outside the box and find a way to get hired.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That usually works if the potential employer decides not to contact you via phone. From my perspective, you got lucky and I applaud you for your efforts in landing the job "sneakily".

      Delete
    2. Hmm, what about history of deaf school you put on applicait for job? What about phone number that most love using voice to talk? I don't see how that work or sneaking that way?

      Delete
  28. Remove deaf from resume

    Give interviewer or HR POC names of terps

    IRS form 8826

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They will not pay for any interpreter; they just don't have to.

      Delete
  29. I am a professional licensed craftsman by trade and a member of the union. Yes union membership is declining and unions do not discriminate any members that come in for job referrals. Due to the 2008 financial meltdown, construction had been hit hardest and unemployment rate all time high kept a deaf craftsman of 20 years experience out of work for 3.5 years. I don't go crying about it after I face the same struggle of trying to find independent work outside the union while I am currently on a waiting list for a job referral from the union. My name is soon coming to the top of the list and I will have a job in a month or two from now. But this is what I learned while trying to get a job outside the union. Employers do not want to hire deaf people and don't have time for us. Instead of crying about it, I did something, another work around. I began accepting side jobs selectively in the trade I normally work in. I have done work for both deaf and hearing customers and I can tell you that there are plenty of good hearing people out there that love me for my work and services that I provide. I am going to tell my VR counselor enough and to stop helping me look for work because the union will refer me to a job and union membership is declining. With that said, I am going to ask my VR for grant and help establishing my own company in the trade and services that I perform. We deaf people need to quit relying on companies to give us jobs, lets go create a company and our customers will provide jobs for us!

    ReplyDelete
  30. I am profoundly deaf (without hearing aids). I know ASL even though I grew up oral. I am in the IT field as a QA Tester. Years ago after I was laid off from my job (as a contractor), I was out of work for 3 years. At the time the dotcom bubble burst and the general lack of IT jobs were the main culprits. I do not know if my deafness figured into any instances where I was not offered a position. It is very hard to prove that they purposefully exclude me because I am deaf. This time around I was let go last year, have been out of work since and looking- even willing to relocate. Despite the fact I leave my cell phone # off the resume and on job boards, I still get MANY emails for job positions. Granted sometimes they are for the same contract job but still it points to my job history and experience. I have had conversations with many recruiters both via phone and in person as well as actual interviews- via phone. Sometimes I am betrayed by my deafness especially if it is a group call.
    But- I can say that I have been hired for several jobs by phone interviews alone. I can think of at least two where they knew I was deaf at the end of the interview; guess what- they hired me. My last position, both my employer and client site were more than willing to assist in any way to provide what I need. I did not always use interpreters because many times meetings get rescheduled four, five times. As for fast-paced...please. Last position was EXTREMELY fast paced- I kept up very well with a combination of emails, one to one verbal at which I do ok with, and writing (loved my giant white board). I almost NEVER used the phone- took me a while to 'train' people to not use the phone to call.
    Point is- while yes I am sure there are employers out there who don't want to hire deaf or don't like to, there are just as many who WILL hire based on what's on their resume and what former employers/co-workers will say about them.

    To the idea of starting your own business and encouraging all deaf to do so- not all deaf folks want to do this. Me for one. I know I don't have the aptitude to run my own business, I know myself better than anyone so I know which jobs are best suited. Managers/Team Leads/Supervisor type job ain't one of them!

    As an aside- it was interesting to read above in the comments about someone with a small business who hires only deaf and refuses to hire hearing. Seems a bit like discrimination there too ;); I do understand the reasoning to wanting an all deaf workforce though.

    PS- the captcha is not very deaf-blind/vision impaired friendly....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While I understand where you're coming from, not every deaf is just as lucky as you are.

      What about those who have a little or no experience at all? Employers will always hire hearing without experience, not deaf.

      I'm gonna have to disagree with what you're saying about owning a business. There is an increasingly amount of deaf people who are unemployed for more than 4 years. What are they supposed to do if they are still waiting to get hired as the time goes by? It's better to start a business than sitting at home & doing nothing but waiting for some hearing to do something for them.

      I work for myself, so it's not that hard.

      Delete
    2. Oh, I forgot to add...

      What's wrong with wanting to hire only Deaf? It's not a discrimination when hearing do have plenty of other opportunities in their own world.

      Delete
  31. You need to learn how to be sneaky on your own and play a game with them by not put your phone number on your resume but only your primary email address instead of. When a company is still clueless about your deafness and sent the email message to you for offering the job interview, then you responded back for your availability for date and time (but do not ask for accommodation aka interpreter yet). Once you get the schedule down for a job interview, then it is a good time to ask for an accommodation. When the company found out that you are deaf, they will likely decide to cancel and reject you out. Remember, it is against the law for the company to cancel the job interview over your deafness or request for accommodation. Then you have a hard evidence to provide the communication discrimination against you from the company.

    You said what if they call me instead of email? Then no problem. You still have to play a game with them too. When the company call you, do not respond back to their call and let them leave a video message. After you watch the video message, make sure you have a video camcorder ready to videotape onto your videophone before you call the company through VRS. If the company did stated that they deny you over your deafness or accommodation, then you have a hard evidence to prove that.

    Like I said before, you have to learn how to be sneaky and play the game.

    Good luck guys and gals!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) can afford to hire sign language interpeter for training deaf employees because CEO makes over million dollars salary.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) can afford to hire sign language interpeter for training deaf employees because CEO makes over million dollars salary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, some are willing to do that, but a lot of them are not no matter how much they make a year. In the business world, they will hire only people for what they can do for them, not what employers can do for employees.

      For them, hiring someone only to have to spend the money on accommodations is a big HELL NO. It may not be fair, but you have to understand the reason behind that.

      Delete
  34. Since is when is a deaf worker with some years of experience too overqualified for the right job? LOL

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hi. Just want to ask u how my picture on ur blog and go spread over all! I would like u remove my pic and I don't know how get my picture on ur blog! Can u remove? Last April 25 2013 I think thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, your picture profile. I didn't put your picture here, you did. Be careful not to sign in on my blog with your facebook ID.

      I don't know how to remove it. Sorry :-(

      Delete
  36. One word: DARS! DARS will help to pay interpreter for interview job! Thats how i got a job and my husband got a job thur DARS because DARS pay for interpreter!! You guys need think about to get DARS to get you a interpreter.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Why you guys wait for them call you or email you for asking if they got your resume? WHY dont you email or call them?! don't be chicken. YOu want to know how, BE CHALLANGE!! don't scare or wait for them call me. Just call them and bother them to make sure they got your resume!!!! Geez!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What in the God's name are you talking about? Who says we didn't follow up? :-)

      Delete
  38. My child is hearing and has a passion for ASL and wants to dedicate her whole life to providing interpreting assistance to others and I would like to help her work towards opening more doors to deaf people in regards to employment in our area. I have to say though that I do see many deaf people teaching others how to live off of SSI or SSDI and not even look for a job. Sadly, I see too many deaf people so angry about life that I would not blame an employer for seeking a more positive applicant. This is not all deaf people, only some, but sadly since hearing people do not usually encounter tons of deaf people, this might be the impression they get. It is a rough job market right out of school or college for all people and all candidates need to think outside the box and really try new tactics to show off how they are the best candidate. Reading comment feeds like this one is what scares me because they are so negative.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Every time I write about employers not wanting to hire deaf applicants, they'd say, "oh, because deaf people are angry, don't want to work. This or that." What does it have to do with the article I wrote?

      As for the deaf who doesn't want to work, I do not condone for what they do, but it's their life.

      As far as my experience goes, not all employers encounter a deaf person, & yet they do want to hire deaf based on communication issues & the spending accommodations. Whether they like it or not, it's a fact.

      I rest my case.

      Delete
  39. I know alot of people who are blind or visually impaired who have similar issues. It is often difficult to find a job that can be accomidated for their visual limits, although with tecnology it is improving. Our state does address the issue by offering a job training w coaches during the summer in fields they are interested in or have an apptitude for.This is for students 15 and older.I think there is a grant and some businesses that help fund it. What I am saying is that I think this consistent issue needs to be addressed at the education level, helping students gain the skills and facilitating connections with businesses to educate them on the abilities and accomodations needed for deaf employees. There is also a manufacturing business here that is set up for and hires mostly blind or VI people at all levels.It has been very successful and is growing quickly. Would something like this work for the deaf community as well? Not the answer for all, but for some. It would least be an option to work and build a resume until what they are really looking for comes along.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hello everybody,
    I see how you all talk about jobs that are very hard. I had been working all in my life as carpenter field and desktop in printing for long time. You have to challenge yourself that you can do for no pay in few days to show your boss how you doing. It is so cool.
    Anyway, you can do work as self-employed as focus on options as stocks because options are more cheap than stocks. You can find many internet how to learn options. I call options that are your part time and earn nice everyday.
    I love options. Apple share costs you 400 dollars a share in stocks which is so expensive but I buy Apple in options as 1.00 per contract for one week hold then sell end of week. Is it so simple? You only need to understand graph in free stockcharts.com. Thank you for your time to read here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just makes it hard when the person with hearing acts like a two year old that does not want to share. Like the Stupid woman here in teaxas Rehab office telling me that I do not have a disability becasue she got me hearing aides. It does not matter that I may hear a third of what is spoken now. It makes no difference that I have to try to comprehend words to decide what is spoken. It is not like a non deaf person hearing with us there is a lag at times to put together statements so we can act on what was spoken. At times that to them makes us appear to be slow. But it is just their not willing to speak up where we can grasp what their saying. So many times it really appears they are saying to heck with you and intentionally speak low. I know of that being done.

      Delete
  41. If I have my own business as a deaf owner, am I allowed to discriminate hearing applicants because they don't know how to use ASL in my business? Will they use ADA laws against me?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL. ADA only applies to people with disabilities. If you discriminate against hearing WITH disabilities, then it could get you in trouble.

      Delete
  42. Unfortunately for Deaf/HH people, employers judge based on English skills. The same thing happens with people from other countries who don't have good communication skills and English is their second language. Employers want ease of communication and often don't have the time to work through the discomfort they have with not being able to understand accents or speech differences. It stinks and many qualified, loyal people are overlooked. I don't have an easy answer, but I try to educate as many people as I can about people with disabilities and giving them a chance. Keep on trying and don't give up; don't let the ignorance of others keep you down. If you have the skills and persevere, the right fit will come. People with disabilities have more to offer than just skills; they have heart, soul, loyalty and inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Yeah very true sad! Many deaf postal workers and I have problem communication with our supervisors in Los Angeles County who cant write English well. Our post offices cant afford interpreter, sad! That is unfair because our supervisors always discrimate against us being deaf. Why cant NAD help us to sue PO? EEOC can not do nothing to sue PO.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I have been welding for a big company in California. I am deaf and I am not very good at read lips and don't speak very well. But been working there for 5 years with no problems. Boss and supervisor has no problems with me at all. They never bothers me. They hired me instantly after they see my weld test and place me in my own booth with other hearing welders we get along very well with hand written paper and body language. Even its easy to communicate with Spanish workers that know no English. But I have been applying 3 different welding company after bad economy I get this problem a lot. So I decided to stay with this currently company ever since.

    ReplyDelete
  45. I studied Human Resources Development with concentration of Organizational Development at RIT, and also am seasoned working with organizations as leader. I also worked at Human Resources of an agency specialized in providing services to hard of hearing, deaf, and deafened community for several years.

    I affirm what you stated in this article. It's so sad. It's usually the "thinking" of people that always got up first before we are able to educate them about the reality of what we can do.

    Currently, I am doing an occupation that I truly enjoy - programming scripts. My own boss. My own schedule. I wouldn't even dream of going back to the workforce. But yes, they still need to be educated what it is really like to have us as their employees, and that they always are mistaken on what they thought of.

    Thank you for the article!

    ReplyDelete
  46. What if u LOST YOUR LACK OF HEARING....how would u like being gulped BIG time... dumb-asses doesn't know how to enjoy and fking learn the communication.. ohhh now that why interpret er r too idiot. For hearing person r just plain asshole. Fuck you all.

    ReplyDelete
  47. same thing happened to me also. too much of other company's drama is reality a poor excuse for not offering a deaf's job because of disability issue and worrying of OHS!

    ReplyDelete
  48. That is true as I have been searched through internet for jobs and lots lots frustrated and upset as I did not give up and I am still looking for jobs as My children are not understand why as Thank you very much so I can post to my darling son about this FUCK FUCK FUCK IDIOTS HEARINGS FOR NOT HIRE ME AS I AM sick of bullshit as I always say to hearings and my children LEV 19:14 as they must figure out and find why

    ReplyDelete
  49. heres the real problems, interpreter are so expensive and that is ruining the deaf life at a real possibilities to get anywhere, interpreters are ruining us with those real high prices, if interpreters prices are cheaper then the deaf communities can get somewhere, so thank the interpreter agencies pppfffttt

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As an interpreter, I agree that the agencies interpreters work for charge a LOT of money. The interpreter earns about half of what the agency charges. What most people don't understand is that most interpreters earn less than $2,000 per month, because there are not enough interpreting hours available. The past several months I worked for a college out of town and had to drive 1 1/2 hours each direction. I earned an average of $360/month, and had to spend about $100 on gas. I did it to help my Deaf friends achieve their goals. Many interpreting agencies are barely making it, in spite of the high prices they charge.

      Delete
  50. Have there been drives and/or petitions to write, occupy or motivate state and federal politions to provide subsidies to compannies to pay for some or all of the cost of interpreters if needed?
    Our taxes paying into this politcal machine. There should be ways to make it work for the sake of filling jobs and keeping the cost down (or in the pockets of company heads). Whatever makes them happier to hire.
    Unions cannot be the only means for this either. Go at them like Teddy Rosevelt.

    ReplyDelete
  51. too many deaf people wants freebies and handouts and dont want to work hard and break a sweat...Too many drifters doing the "activist" thing to no avail.

    ReplyDelete
  52. If it wasnt for SSI or SSD, Deaf people SURE will FIND A JOB Quickly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. FYI, SSI/SSD is barely enough to cover all living expanses. Try to find another excuse why many Deaf don't work.

      Delete
  53. Many of them said why work if I can get free money and they expect to get HIGH paying job with no work history when they get free money for years

    ReplyDelete
  54. Too many of them quit when work gets real hard and companies dont like wasting money when they work up to 2 or 3 months and quit to keep SSI.

    ReplyDelete
  55. My grandparents were deaf and had jobs. All of their deaf friends had jobs. So deaf people can get jobs and succeed at them. IGNORANT PEOPLE SUCK!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have not mentioned that you're deaf, so what gives you the right to call us ignorant? What do you know about it?

      Delete
    2. I assume these grandparents were working in a booming economy...if our economy jumps back there will be jobs. I know hearing people that don't have jobs because there just are not many out there. Go to school and get a degree in technology or the blue collar jobs I see a few mention. Construction, web design, etc,

      Delete
  56. I read this and have to give my two cents. I as a business owner who lost my business because of our local deaf community.
    A deaf individual applied for a job with me in which he was clearly not qualified. I specifically asked for a degree in computer science, and a series of certifications. After I told the applicant that I could not hire him based on his lack of qualifications, he still proceeded to sue me due to discrimination.
    After the court proceedings, I ended up broke as I was unable to work for a month while working with my lawyer and sitting in court and had to close my business. I'm now having a hard time finding work and will soon be forced to sell my house.
    I know a lot of you hate the hearing, I can read it throughout the comments, but we're willing to work with you, but there are a lot of business owners who can't afford interpreters, there are a lot of fears of being sued, and it's hard to hire someone who clearly hates you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry to hear that & I hope you don't hate us for this. Unfortunately, there is a law that allows deaf to sue companies that don't hire them or provide accommodations, & you know what? It won't work out in our favor because employers tend to avoid us. It definitely gives hard working deaf people a bad name.

      Delete
    2. One of my closest friends is deaf. I am also fluent in ASL. What everyone needs to understand is that most employers hire based on qualifications. We live in a very tough time for anyone, hearing or deaf to get work. I have been looking for work since I lost my business. Since I was a business owner, I don't get unemployment for losing my business. My wife is now supporting both of us on 30k per year. It's not easy for anyone.

      Delete
  57. Before 30 I never had spoken a single word. I'm still learning to speak as a baby for 2 1/2 years and now in several hundred words worth of vocabulary size. In the past, I didn't support older generation CI due to numerous problems, but I now embrace the current generation CI. I strongly prefer totally internal and invisible CI, so the ignorant people couldn't be able to notice that unless recharging. So, I would imagine that I'm extremely eager to see how employers respond if I would become proficient in spoken language within a few years in the future, especially wearing the totally internal and invisible CI. No, I won't try to admit anyone that I'm deaf. For our info, approximately 50-50 chance that my electrical engineering field indicates, "excellent verbal communication is a must."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For someone who had never spoken a word before 30, it takes a LOT of training & practice. Still, I applaud you for your efforts.

      We live in a big hearing world, so therefore we do what we have to do to survive.

      Delete
  58. Another reason and a big one is employers had bad experience with former Deaf Employees and their demands. Once they are hired they are to follow same rules as hearing employees, not demand special treatment cuz thy are deaf...Deaf Culture has NO place in the workplace for any job.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I have heard about & seen the "demanding" attitudes some deaf employees display toward their bosses. I think they need to be more educated about how to appropriately approach hearing people & understand the concepts of the real world. No one would give you a special treatment for no reason.

      Delete
    2. Deaf Culture has NO place? that makes no sense. A Deaf person has a culture, therefore his essence will permeate in the workplace. Besides, 99.9% of workplaces are Hearing Culture mind you!

      Delete
  59. I have a deaf relative...He was hired to a good paying job at a Battery Making place that pays great and has great benefits, there are close to 2500 employees there, After finding out he's be required to work weekends he declined taking the job...His excuse was too many Deaf Culture Events on weekends...Happy Hours, Deaf Expos....ETC Hearing people KNOW having a job is more important than going out every weekend for a good time..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, my goodness. That's just awful.

      Delete
    2. Yeah awful, that same relative will be 24 yrs old in December and still never has had job since graduation, refuses weekend work, refuses any 2nd or 3rd shift work satisfied with SSI of $800 a month just shows how lazy some deaf are..Iff he was hearing he wouldn't be getting any SSI and have to work doing whatever...

      Delete
    3. Well, I have seen some hearing people faked their disability in order to get SSI benefits. I know someone who's deaf works 3 jobs to support themselve. I also know someone else who rather depends on SSI than get a job that can pay the bills like your relative.

      At the end of the day, it's not your deafness or disability that does that, it's who you are that does that.

      Delete
  60. Your just as bad as the people who won't hire you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous, Above from here and Strerras is correct your point? and move your ass to find a job. You have walking with 10 toes to find a job instead mooches and sitting do nothing to do... you are waste your time. it is your problem.. Move your ass.. Go to unemployment office to getting some education and hire ASL interpreter they will provided.

      Delete
  61. Best way to get a job is advertising yourself what you can do, tell them only need an interpreter for interview because it is a formal meeting, Not during training time, I made a clear to my employer that I do not need an interpreter during training and do my work independent time (2nd shift, when my employer is home). Now, he just tell everyone faculty that I'm his best assistant ever he had, even he is still begging human resource to grant me a full-time with benefit when I graduate in may 2014. Most important is...anyone who know how to do independent, on their own, showing that you know to do with those things. Right now, I'm Education Support Specialist I for 3 1/2 years...they are trusting me very completely to do independent work. My best advise for Deaf people to showing that you can do very independent person that most companies want. Trust me, most COMPANIES WANT THAT.

    ReplyDelete
  62. maybe it's the interpreters high fees that's a problems. maybe th ey should reduce their high fees that they charge less than a hour work. if they found them maybe more employer's well be willing to give more deafies a job interview.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I work for a company. I am the only hard of hearing person in that company. But, I don't need all this things such as interpreter, and so on. so, my question is does this company get free tax because of hired me?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Osonegro, Depend on deaf have a vision impair as such likely Usher Syndromes or other .. Hire ASL interpreter instead of oral.. likely you can hear some.. Most Deaf people cannot lipread. How do you expect if you became profound deaf. you have to take ASL before too late. some 90% hearing parent have a some deaf children in USA. Need to hire deaf employer. No matter what?

      Delete
    2. no, there's no tax breaks just for hiring you

      Delete
  64. Bullshit USA suck!

    ReplyDelete
  65. I'd like to know what states the actual DRS workers helps you to find jobs, cause we're getting nowhere here in VA w/ ours....

    ReplyDelete
  66. The programs available to disabled are not truly helping them get off the system. My daughter is deaf. She was working with DVR to get her into school full time and a part time job so she can get off the system. Well they helped her get a pt job cutting vegetables. Supplied interpreter and paid her wage for 6 weeks. Good start I thought... She is in school FT now and her ssi has been reduced as the grant $ that is suppose to help you with school expenses and gas getting there and back etc. was counted as income so now she is struggling even more than before. And DVR is not helping with school expenses because they helped her get a PT min wage job. Really? The idea of these services are to get you off the system and a pt job isn't doing that. She loves working but the struggle is very bad. She doesn't eat as she should and can not travel the 1 hour trip to visit us. I worry what happens if she has unexpected car problems etc.
    What really burns me is they are not steering her in the right directions. They should have said you need an education first if u want to support yourself. She is in a child care program which I don't think pays well either, She wants to change to construction and get a physical job. She had a shoulder replacement at 24 yrs old so I also don't think that is the way to go. Computers and technology I think is her best bet. Any other suggestions? My suggestion when u get DVR help tell them you want education NOT a flimsy PT job. Full-time job would be good also, I know some Walmarts hires deaf people..

    ReplyDelete
  67. I am deaf.. vr is full of shit.. vr didn't give you a your dream jobs!!!

    ReplyDelete
  68. All united states Really fuck dumb ass that very wrong. All deals people races had to be legally right go to work because they need Really jobs who had children, rent, pay bill or doctor and more etc. That Really fuck idiots employees and united states had to be patient respect all deals people race had to do it best become successful in the goal future. This very serious all deaf people race not play they really need so badly jobs hiring.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Great idea!...Hope it is helpful for Deaf people... thank you for your advices.. :D

    ReplyDelete
  70. Deaf need affirmative action. There is disproportionate amount of incarcerated and unemployed Deaf/HOH. It is a systemic problem inherent in society conditioned in Audism. "Good communication skills required" is code for Deaf need not apply. We are a linguistic minority and deserve equal rights. Accommodation is a social issue that benefits everyone. Deaf style communication is an asset to the linguistic landscape and can benefit the workplace by providing creative, innovative thinking and problem solving. blah blah blah

    ReplyDelete
  71. From what I learned myself, most companies does not want to hire deaf people because of risk high insurance liability. Really deaf people always tend to use their eyes more than deaf ears! they are good workers because they have to use their hands to do but for hearing people can talk and use hands same time which is not fair. I can see how frustration for deaf people in this world are having hard time to find permanent job in long run.

    ReplyDelete
  72. If you're in Missouri, contact VR. There are fluent ASL job developers all over the state. We also know how to work with companies to maximize accomodations. I can't speak for other states, but Missouri does it right.

    ReplyDelete
  73. While this article can be correct it can also be incorrect. I'm hearing with deaf husband and the deaf person who said hearing people are lazy is true..most hearing people just don't want to deal with deaf people however its stupid comments that they make about the hearing that make them not a likeable person. I don't think it's right to tell the deaf they're wasting their time. It also has alot to do with the deaf person. My husband doesn't give two craps about a translator. We just live in a discrimination world where the hearing is spoiled. Most of u hearing people wouldn't last a minute being deaf. And on another note most deaf people tend to stay longer at jobs and to answer your question of who is hire it would depend on their skills. I wouldn't turn someone away just cuz they deaf.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Thats why I joined a relationship marketing business as an independent agent to grow my own business and income. The business is most deaf friendly ever I have experience with other companies. Check their website www.seacretdirect.com/marklong. Email me at warriorm60@gmail.com for more information or question. Wish you a good luck for hunting a new job.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Hearing people are the fucking NAZI!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Someone from Anonymous, if you still lives with your parents.. who wont let you.. you can run away from your parent .. it is not necessary to allow her to control you, you are adult.

      Who is Anonymous? Why you lives parents forever?

      Someone posted "Also I did applied a job but my mom won't let me get job. I am frustration with my mom. I still consider plan move to the states and find a VR will help me to find a job. I hope so."

      Delete
    2. you should report to Human Civil Right to getting your help to fight with your mother who should not control your decision or make a decision as you mean cannot live the independent .. Your mother consideration as kidnapped you or not allow you go anywhere.. your english is better than mine.

      You should call police if you are adult as more than 19 yr old. you can run and find a place first before without your parent knowledge.

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  76. The number one department to distrust is Human Resources. They are not there for you but to protect the company from lawsuits and costly hiring processes. But a lot of things got shaken up during the worst Bush economic disaster which caused massive layoffs further hurting job opportunities for Deaf people. I have applied over 500 highly qualified matching job applications and only got 3 preliminary job interviews and never got contacted again. So, I retire at 40 and did what you said, "start a little business" but very few business owners will make more money than their old job and the cost is high. For instance, I have a pretty good size of customers but still make zero profit and haven't been paid a salary in 4 years.

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  77. We should reconsider that we need a new amendment for which the companies has number of the employee like 300 less or more whatever and should 2 or more Deaf to work for the company if not Deaf work for company should fine about around $20,000 to 50,000 thousand. That way the company saw fine they have to hire Deaf than pay the fine. We need to make a new amendment. What do you think?

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    1. It can't become an amendment for obliviously reason but it can become federal law. But how would you feel that you have to hire mentally challenged employee and you were forced to invest alot of money and time on training that employee and yield little return to avoid hefty penalties. Also, federal government or state government doesn't have any power to force company to hire specific employee because it will open huge can of worms so we don't want that. But some company have experience with employing deaf individuals and they doesn't like it because of communication barrier, lazy employee, and etc. There are no clear solution for this discrimination, sorry. Going back to school may not work for everyone since I had seen some people with 2 masters degree can't find a job. Nor rant about it online going to work. The best way is to find a way to cope with it by using your head. This is dog eating dog world.

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  78. Post office are no longer hire deaf people too work for them after 1987 bec 2 deaf people sue the post office over little thing. Big corporation heard that. Don't blame them.

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    1. Anonymous, Speaking of Post Office are no longer to hire for Deaf People.. it is not true.. You have to file complaint to EEOC if they are discrimination you without interpreter or some kind of refused to call you after they found out you are deaf after they contact you. you can will win the case. Easy way to keep your job track with a date and time.. Specifically date and time with video relay service operator number along with name of relay service company. they will find a number and phone number, etc.
      if former Post Office employer cannot go back. if new person who want to applicatons for Post Office instead of continue barrier.

      Second things, Don't gave up and Don't passive ... Very simple.. use your enpower words or nice comment to job interview.

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  79. I cant believe that their stories but I raised my adopted parents taught me to work my dads business and my mom's business and I was working at the macys in las Vegas no matter what u can do to look any jobs but u can write the conversation for job interviews. I was working by faa ohare , sears 1668 and smith's 383 , McDonalds and red brick pizza and now macys. ?...they wereso wonderful to ask me to teach them for sign language.some workers know to sign too . Im lucky that my2 new hearing friends. Detr helps mealotand they paid me for clothes for interviews and new hearing aids. But no matter to me but I deserve to see any deaf people can do it and not give up ur hopes and goals in future.

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  80. As someone who has become deaf over the years. I can attest to this as fact. I was laid off in 2010 from a very well paying job. I have 2 degrees from very well known colleges, and I was unable to find a job with a fair wage based on my education and previous experience. I also started my own business, and one thing I have realized is that people will STILL turn their backs if they know there is some type of disability involved. I just recently found a steady position with a new company that is working with me on my hearing, as well as an upcoming surgery for a cochlear implant.

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  81. U know I work hard for last 10 years spend 1 year training then went find job nothing for long time then went school for training for be welder for year I felt like an waste so year later found government job to build navy ship and they have told me on hire out said they cant hire deaf due of safety cuz of osha I said really b.s. I said what is that on paper that have hire disabilities so they look at me ok hire on got so happy been there 2 years and join union so . And I have told many people not be afraid of deaf people jus like I seen alot solders and navy's became deaf over running all mechine guns so like I said this country is not freedom anymore and Osha an retard dont blame government it osha

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  82. I'm having trouble finding good people for my house cleaning business. I'm slammed every week with work. Yes, its low skill and we can't pay much ($9-14/hr), but it would be good, steady income for the right person. I've worked with DHH in the past and know a little ASL. Should I try to recruit a DHH person?

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  83. 85% means DEAF people got UNMPLOYMENT or JOBLESS.....................15% means OTHER NORMAL People EMPLOYMENT....
    Other deaf people are so tired to look and find their job at any company but other Hr manager, or other hearing people are not hired us, or not aware how to communicated us what cant talk to other deaf. how? if example. cant Sign language. I say ''NO'' example, you can handwritten to other deaf if they can read so understand. if other hearing people think they look like abnormal... I say NO NO NO. they are not abnormal. same normal people. but not dumb.. they can see, be strong, can activity, can manner, can help other, can copy to other hearing how to step (instruction), never talking to other hearing people because they are quiet than their noise. they can focus their own work when they cant hear.
    even TALENT, SKILLS and ETCS.. May God bless you

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  84. Been reading all the posts both positive and negative…how interesting to see all aspects regarding job hunting for the deaf and hard of hearing. Let me briefly introduce myself as a 50 year old person who is profoundly deaf and low vision since birth. Knows sign language since 5 and can speak fairly well. Am highly educated and very literate with a BA degree to boot.
    Majored in Social Work and did plenty of volunteer work in that area. Did work for an agency for 6 months but it didn’t work out so I left that job. Looked around for another job but decided (had no choice) to apply to work in manufacturing as it was around the start of the Great Recession. Did I try to move to another department? You bet I did and twice I was put in Document Imaging and Film Transferring but each time they fell apart. So back to square one. I am NOT blaming anyone at the company as it is a dead end. The people there at the company do employ deaf and those with other disabilities so they are understanding about the fact that the employment for the deaf and deaf-blind are hard to come by out there. The HR director says that they know that manufacturing is NOT for everyone but will still support me until I find work elsewhere. Meaning I can still work at this company and work on my new skills in web design and coding in my own time. This will take time and patience.
    I am sorry to hear from those feel they were treated negatively by employers, and others in their job hunt. Blaming the employers or being on SSI, etc is not productive or helpful even for the job seeker. I do get depressed time to time but try to think positive to keep going. I see hearing people act negatively and get demanding in a similar way as the deaf. No matter if one is hearing or deaf, ATTITUDE is the key and be creative in finding ways to improve oneself in a positive way in these times. By seeing that positive attitude, it will be likely a good chance that this person will be hired. If all else fails, start a business…or to help others for a start using your skills that you have.

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  85. Oh geez, I just wrote a long comment and it disappeared!! Let me try again! :)

    Sarah,

    You just hit a center target on discrimination between Deaf/HOH and companies. I am profoundly hard of hearing and first 16 years I speak orally until ASL has integrated when I was junior in highschool. On personal note, I am feeling discrimination all round me, even the ASL critics, I am somewhat fluent of ASL, although there are great professional people on both side of the cultures. It is frustrating that I face discrimination every where I go. Even watching CNN news with no closed captions on computer.

    I have been laid off 4 times in the fast pace companies, by all means on my intuitives, the communication barrier is too great for them. They didn't say it was a problem, but after I considered and reviewed my performance and communications, I strongly believe it has been a problem to them. They found a way to get rid of me because lets just face it, this nation companies are enterprises, they don't want to step back to problems that costs them, or they want very minimal of setbacks while the companies are money making machines.

    After I had long collective hours of work at a fast pace company, I felt the heaviness of discrimination because isolation becomes evolving into me. After "honeymoon" of a new job, no body has patience to repeat themselves to me when I ask them to repeat, just remember I speak very well and they hardly could tell I am hard of hearing. So after I review my experiences, when the crises or situations rises and deaf/hoh employee have little self advocate, it ends up a bad taste then enters to a state of confusion. It is hard to distinguish and tolerate the discrimination inside the jobs. Then educated employees and employers still discriminate by retaliating. I believe Deaf/hoh ends up not get along with the hearing people and couldn't grasp the concept of "social standards" in hearing working environment, this is speaking out of my experience, does not apply to all of you. I can't keep up with their social standards without services I need. After working at a ASL friendly state job, I held this job longer than any other job I have had.

    I dont know if this idea exist, but its worth to give a shot: Implement a bill to pass a law that could put a policy for fast pace companies to educate themselves about this federal or state organization that processes, mediates, and records interview of a deaf applicant/interviewee and interviewer. Then this organization reviews all the other applicants for qualification purposes that meets the job description. Then organization creates a safeguard for both parties fast pace companies and deaf/hoh cultures. Deaf applicant need to understand the organization is collecting datas and are confidential, cannot be shared to any of applicants. If the deaf person feels and decides to sue the company for discrimination on his/her own perception, this organization legally testifies in court. Stronger the documents are the least likely of costing the companies to pay for fees. This could also apply to all other disabilities.

    As for discrimination inside the job, its hard to say, because there is no easy around to it. Only way is for companies to be aware what kind of services needed for the deaf/hoh employees. And thats hard to come by. Unless somebody else already had the idea to reduce the tensions.

    A lot of companies are UNEDUCATED about deaf culture, and it is hard to keep up because we are a minority. And sadly the ASL environment also have non signers that are discriminators. This effects causes me to think that I support SSI and SSDI, without it the oppression will be greater.












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  86. When increase SSDI? Because it is clearly we are being discriminated and ought to increase more SSDI to able survive without working. More for us than them then they will demand to hire us to reduce spending taxes on us.

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