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Saturday, January 19, 2013

What are the best jobs for deaf people?

First off, let me just say that Deaf people can do anything they want as long as they are truly passionate about what they do. As long as you believe in yourself and have what it takes to be at where you want to be, you probably will make it. Whatever job it may be, just remember that there are many obstacles and challenges that you need to deal with on the road to success. It's great that we have ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) to protect our rights, but we still have a long way to go!

This is for people who are not ready to become one of the few deaf people to pursue any "risky" career. For example, some deaf people are studying to become a real estate agent, which is a huge risk they're willing to take. That is because they know the estate realty agencies may or may not accept deaf candidates for this job.

Here is a list of jobs that are safer for deaf people (non-risk-takers) in relation to services for deaf clients/customers:

1. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor

2. Therapist (for deaf patients)

3. School Counselor

4. Teacher (of any subject) in Deaf Education

5. Employment Specialist for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

6. ASL Teacher (may be specifically for hearing students who want to learn ASL)

7. Customer Service Rep. for deaf customers (rarely but there are quite a few jobs out there)

8. Audiologist

9. Writer/Editor/Proofreader (you must have strong English skills)

10. Starting a business of your own (you have to create something unique and necessary for people's daily lives)

11. Deaf Services Manager

12. Human Services

Of course, these career possibilities may not be for everyone, but if you are talented and have a lot to offer, then you may want to consider your career options carefully. The best way to start is find something that fits your personality and your lifestyle. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is if you choose a specific career just based on your preference of income earnings. Otherwise, you will not be satisfied with your job choice.

One thing we know for sure is that jobs in the creative industries are very, very competitive. Even some deaf people are having a hard time finding graphic design jobs in these days. If you graduated with a degree in graphic design and can't find a job in this field, then starting the graphic design business may be the best option for you. The same can be said for fashion design, advertising, or any other creative jobs.

With this "deaf people can do anything except hear" mentality, I think many people are assuming that just because you have skills, you would have more chances of getting hired by any company. It's easier said than done. In actuality, the companies and employers do not think the same way as we, deaf people, do about us. For them, verbal communication is a must in order to get things done quickly, and they do not have time to write down the notes or to send a text message to deaf employees. That's why they are pushing potential deaf applicants over to low-paying jobs that doesn't require verbal communication. They, as always, underestimate our abilities.

Unless you are looking to earn extra income, retail jobs, especially backroom/stocking positions, aren't the best ones to choose from. Usually, they don't last any longer, and don't forget that it's a minimum wage. If you don't care as long as it's a job, then good luck to you!

Maybe, some people may not agree with what I just said, but these facts are in reality that we sometimes need to face. For some reasons, I think many people are afraid to admit the truth of what I've already wrote here. Well, that's why I'm here--to tell you the truth.

Check out other articles at https://deafcantgetjobs.blogspot.com if you haven't already read.

Thanks for the reading, and have a good day or night!

Please like http://facebook.com/DeafUnemployment

Check out the new ebook, "What Every Deaf Person Needs to Know", at https://sarahterras.selz.com

65 comments:

  1. As always, an insightful post. I totally agree that communicstion remain a huge barrier. I'm still seeking employment, after being laid off over a year ago, and I'm being asked "creative" questions in my interviews. Even my references are being asked how communication was done in the workplace with me. Is that more important than my abilities to do the job and what I have to offer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would seem that the communication comes first before your skills, which it put us at the bottom of the totem pole. For them, hearing disability is a lack of communication. It's not fair, is it?

      If you love doing what you do (job wise), then you shouldn't give up. Depending on your profession, I'm sure there are many possibilities or ideas to go with it.

      Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
    2. i keep try find job for my dad because he is deaf. i am deaf too. But my dad hard to find job for him but i try help find job for him. he loves tools.

      Have any idea for tools jobs for my dad?
      Please comment for idea for my dad thanks!

      Delete
    3. Hi Mouse, have your dad ever considered working for Sears, Home Depot, or Lowe's? They are always looking for someone with repair and tool skills Also, try checking with your local or city to see if they are hiring for tool jobs for state or city/town.

      Your dad may need some experience first, so I would suggest doing volunteer work in tool opportunities. Employers probably wouldn't even look at job applicants without experience.

      Delete
    4. Why do we keep suggesting people work minimum wage jobs? I don't understand the concept behind that at ALL.

      Delete
    5. In response to the last comment ^^...

      Here are two simple concepts:

      1. In my experience, you can't have a high paying job if you don't start from the bottom first.

      2. Many of us are forced to work low wage jobs because high level job companies don't hire us just like that.

      Delete
    6. I have fairly good speech and have very little hearing left, but I still have problems in finding an employment. Got laid off from good paying job, worked for an employment agency that worked for the Gov't and hired disabled people. I have been looking for work for 3 years now, and have to swallow my pride by accepting $8 an hour, job, just to put foods on the table. It barely can pays anything, let alone the apt!
      Hearing people can avoid getting low paying jobs by being able to hear and talk, and not difficult for them to find any jobs they desire.
      Even simple data entry and general office work, want to hire people who will do customer service, answers and talks to customers on phones. Explained that I could use the emails and faxes. They did not want that, and only want people to talk.
      I feel like I can't support my family and feel that it is no point in living if I can't support my family and myself. My brother and sisters all have high paying jobs except for me. 3 of them did not go to College and already earning a lot of money. I had to go to 5 Colleges in my life time and still earning low wages. I have good skills, but like someone said here, that employers want to hire people with communication skills over the task skills.

      Delete
  2. Without effective one to one communication you won't get an interview in the UK and it isn't illegal to refuse. Basically it makes real sense not to turn up in sheer hope you can bluff your way through. We have had cases, where they refused a job because an deaf person turned up with legal support, as the deaf applicant could not convince an employer he could work unaided. You were dead in the water turning UP with support, that was a killer ! Can't do an interview alone, can't do a job either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That makes it very complicated for deaf applicants in UK. Is there such a law that allows them to take legal action if they are being discriminated by employers? If not, then this legal system simply doesn't help deaf people who are applying for jobs.

      Delete
  3. Discrimination was not proven over the decision taken. The employer can claim it is unclear a deaf person requiring support to do an interview could do an job without it. There is no hard and fast rule here, employers are bound to fund it if needed. It really depends on the job. IT customer interactions no a deaf person would have tremendous issues proving capability to work alone, that is why most deaf work well below any capability they have. Sod's law states if you sue an employer others will find a way to prevent an applicant being seen. There were claims of some 'blacklist' circulating. The legal system doesn't help here. An employer can take on who he or she wants or reject accordingly. They cannot refuse an interview without good reason, but most, when you state you are deaf, just bin the application or state 'post filled'.

    ReplyDelete
  4. What about working in the Medical Field? I am a Registered Medical Assistant and in October it was discovered that due to a birth defect that was not notice I lost my hearing completely in my left ear and partial in my right ear. I now have hearing aids but can not put a stethoscope in my ears to do blood pressure, but I still want to work in the Medical Field. It is my passion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can do anything you want as long as you have truly passion for it. I heard somewhere that there was a deaf doctor that used special stethoscope with visual aid. You may want to do a further research on what kind of visual aided stethoscopes you can find. You have to make sure you have everything ready for a job you apply for if they want to interview you.

      If you keep getting rejected because of your lack of hearing despite your great qualifications, then file a complaint with EEOC for discrimination.

      Delete
    2. http://www.hearmore.com/categories/42/Stethoscopes.html

      Delete
    3. Stethoscopes are available with aids inside them for deaf. I have seen them.

      Delete
    4. I agree with anonymous, I to is in the medical field for over 28 yrs. deaf lft ear, hearing in right ear w/ some slurred speech. i'm passionate about my career and now its gone to waste because of deafness and minimum wage paying domestic care its hard to keep my health in order w/ less pay and all the skills and experience under my belt--- help

      Delete
  5. I have mixed feelings about the feel-good statement when well-meaning organizations preach to deaf children/audiences "You can be WHATEVER you want to be." I find that comment to be unrealistic, and I would NEVER tell a deaf person that. (By the way, I am a deaf person too, so please don't shoot me for saying this). How I would word the sentence is, "There are different opportunities out there (for deaf people), but not all of them may be the right fit for you." To me, that's a more realistic statement compared to "OOOOH YOU CAN BE WHATEVER YOU WANT TO BE!" For example, I don't find these jobs suitable for deaf people:

    1. Air traffic controllers

    2. Receptionists (with the exception of those working at deaf organizations)

    3. Firefighters -- The only one deaf firefighter I know of even said this in an interview: "I do have limited responsibilities with the fire department. I mean, I can't enter a structure fire or a call involving hazardous material. The reason why is because I'd have to wear an air mask and couldn't read the other firefighters' lips because they'd be wearing air masks too. That would make communication too difficult." Which basically separates him from the regular firefighter crew. I am not saying it is a bad thing -- but again, it proves my point.

    4. Police officers that are on PATROL duty (those who respond to emergency situations, can communicate via radio in a police car,and have to interact with the public). Again, I am sure there are a few deaf police officers who are delegated to desk jobs. What I am talking about here is the police officers who can respond to public/emergency situations.

    5. Flight attendants.

    Anyway, these are just a few examples I can think of at the moment. Please don't take it as I have a prejudice against anyone in the deaf community. My point here is - it's just unrealistic to walk around preaching "YOU CAN BE WHATEVER YOU WANT TO BE."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't agree more. It's not fair to tell deaf people that they can be whatever they want to be because the reality is gonna hit them real hard.

      Anyone shouldn't be offended by your comment because that is true. We need to be realistic with deaf children and high school students who are on their way to college or finding a job after graduation.

      Delete
    2. I agree with you totally. I heard that all the time. It is unrealistic and untrue. Do the best as you can!

      Delete
  6. I agree, "YOU CAN BE WHATEVER YOU WANT TO BE" isn't realistic for a lot of deaf people. We cannot hear and there are many jobs that require you to hear, communicate and talk on the phone, deal with the customers. I've had to avoid a lot of jobs due to those requirements which cuts down what's left. Not to add to injury, the competition is fierce out there. We cannot compete with hearing people in this economy. I am deaf and am having hard time finding a job as it is. I would LOVE to work at home, doing live help for people online. That's my dream. You know those live chat help where you help people through chat. That would be perfect for many deaf people. How you get those jobs, I don't know. I'm almost 50 and life isn't looking good. I cannot wait until my time on earth is done. Get outta this stupid hearing world that doesn't care about the minorities but themselves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I have just told someone below me, there are a ton of virtual job opportunities on the Internet. Your English is excellent, so I bet you have more opportunities.

      Check out this link about self-employed careers: http://deafcantgetjobs.blogspot.com/2013/02/companies-dont-want-deaf-people-screw.html

      You have to try out what's work for you.

      Delete
  7. Hi! I am deaf. I need a job...I cant find job because many people who work there and they were not approving me because i am DEAF. that's stupid. I need your help!
    Thanks..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, a lot of Deaf people are in exactly the same situation as you are in right now. Nowadays, jobs are extremely hard to get given the fact that they view us as "disabled" by their definition, meaning not able to work.

      Instead of looking to companies to hire you, try to come up with solutions of how to make money like starting your own business or finding a virtual job online.

      In this recession, many people, hearing or deaf, are starting self-employed business to pay the bills.

      I hope I helped.

      Delete
    2. I even applied for disability and was found not disabled enough to qualify. that hurts

      Delete
    3. I know several friends who were denied disability as well. You are not alone.

      Delete
  8. My brother is 70% hearing impaired and wants to start a small household business in Maharashtra, India. Can he get a consultant or mentor with what best he can do with his abilities to start a profitable small business?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Yes, he should get a mentor to help him get a headstart on his business. He may need help on brainstorming ideas for his business if he hasn't already. It doesn't really matter what percentage of hearing loss. All he needs is an intelligence & a strong drive to realize his dream.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. And that's a major problem -- who is speaking on behalf of the deaf community for BETTER jobs??? I have a degree with a 3.4 GPA and I work in Sears -- but it's nowhere near what I SHOULD be able to find.
      Also, this is random but is it okay for a deaf person to wear a recorder daily if they feel they are being discriminated against or mistreated? Considering they can't HEAR what COULD be going on around them?

      Delete
    2. That's an interesting question about the recorder. I really don't see why not, but I'm not sure if it would be allowed in court in case you have any problems with Sears. If I were you, I'd ask a lawyer to make sure we can legally record the conversations behind our backs.

      Delete
    3. Hi everybody. Am still looking for work & has been 3 years now. I applied 6-8 jobs per week for 3yrs and only got 6 interviews. I got a few calls that said I would get interviews. No calls! Most of jobs I applied, are employment recruiting agencies. Had interviews with them. Not one of them called me. And when they did, they quickly found out I am deaf and they created excuses why I wasn't selected by saying other candidates were more qualify than me. That is common words they use, everytime.
      I noticed on available jobs online, that many of simple jobs such as data entry clerk, started requiring customer services, helping receptionists, phone answering and calling. I never saw that 5 years ago. My caseworker at the Work Force Center, tries forcing me to accept low-paying jobs that are way below my skills. I won't accept many of them, based on glassdoor.com. To see the reviews of the companies, is to check the www.glassdoor.com, click on company, type the name of company you consider applying, and type the location. There are several options, overview, salaries, reviews and other two. Click on reviews. People will tell you what their experiences and feelings about the companies they work for. It is good to check before you apply, or someone forces you to apply, before you apply. Avoid companies which have uncaring, inexperienced managers and easy to get fired for little thing. When a deaf person is fired, then s/he will have much harder time finding an employment. It is better not to take the job if it has many bad reviews Respect yourselves by finding a good company even if they don't pay much, but you will stay there long time.

      Delete
  10. Major hotels , Housekeeping, housemen, banquet servers, cook , dishwasher. It is great job to work with major hotel industry such Marriott, Hilton and more.
    It is easy to move up the position after good performance. I started with on-call banquet server for first two years then manager asked me to move up full time banquet server. Now I work as full time banquet server for 15 years at major hotel and earn over $53,000 a year plus full benefits. I strongly recommend deaf people try hotel positions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is great and a rarity! I am glad for your success. Thank you for your advise.

      Delete
  11. I worked for a company that supported a Quality Assurance engineer who was deaf. She had a TTY at work and an interpreter for meetings. She was promoted to Principal Engineer (a position that paid over $40K back in 1983 - which was a lot of money in those days). She was a graduate of Galladet college. I have not seen or heard of any computer company that has done this since...(it was MAI Basic Four in Tustin, CA - now defunct). I don't think most computer companies would do this these days - but I could be wrong. One can communicate via email and interpreters may be financed via some other fund. Those with hearing aids may have less chances for accommodation. Companies can always say that you were not the best applicant - so its dicey. Still I think there may be opportunities out there.

    ReplyDelete
  12. what are the popular field where deaf people can have job facilities in long term view?...

    ReplyDelete
  13. Communication Service for the Deaf in Austin Texas wants to hire deaf Software Engineers!

    ReplyDelete
  14. HI MY NAME IS KATHY FIELDS FROM INDIANAPOLIS,INDIANA

    I KEEP TRY TO FIND JOB FOR ME BECAUSE I AM DEAF BUT I TRY
    TO HELP FIND FOR ME.

    HAVE ANY IDEA FOR A TYPIST JOB OR DATA ENTRY IS NOT EXPERIENCE WITHOUT NECESSARY

    MY EMAIL IS KATHY 46220@YAHOO.COM

    THANK YOU
    KATHY FIELDS

    ReplyDelete
  15. After reading all the posts on here, I agree its a tough world out there. We shouldn't moan and groan. If you really want it so badly, you got to want it. I was out of work for a year and have a two years old child. Was recently redundant, talk about bad timing between maternity leave and redundancy. I request JCP to send me through Deaf Employment Agency. I was refered to them, within 3 months with the agency i got a job. Not ideally job, but its a job where I can climb up the ladders again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's understandable. We do what we have to do to pay the bills.

      Delete
    2. Ditto! I have to swallow my pride by accepting a low wage job which I will start tomorrow. There is no career advancement. The hourly pay stays same as today from 2004!

      Delete
    3. Yes, I had to swallow by accepting the low wage job. There is no career advancements.

      Delete
  16. I'm new here, I am returning to school, but not work. I speak (I have no idea how well) and school begins in a few days. I will be an English major with a concentration in Writing. I'd love to have a regular job - not gonna happen anytime soon. I am 50 years old and I manage M.S.; or, does it manage me? (smile) I had a deaf cardiologist when I lived in TX, I really didn't like him. Was it the deafness? Of course not, he was trying to over diagnose me and I knew that I didn't have the issue he was trying to find. His office help was far from professional; so, my last visit to his office resulted in me yelling at the staff due to their incompetence as I walked out for good. Deafness is one thing, the M.S. another and is probably the main cause of my disability. I do aspire to enter the editorial field. I have a hearing friend who is a technical writer (also an English major), she encourages me in this and tells me to run towards my goals. I currently have trouble with accommodations for my volunteer work, so I don't really bother with paying jobs at this time. I have had so many experiences that I would love to write about.

    ReplyDelete
  17. All of us need to keep a positive outlook and be realistic with the skills and experiences that we have that will provide a stepping stone to your next job. I share most of the experiences that all of you have listed thus far. In 2009, I was laid off and I went on several interviews. One company I interviewed with them 3 times and I feel well qualified to do the job and felt that the interviews went very well. I called to find out why I was rejected, their response was that they select another candidate. I found it hard to believe because I had been with this company 18 years and left for 3 years for another position. Anyway, in 2010 I went back to school and got my Masters in Accounting and Financial Management in May 2013. I have been looking really hard for the last 4 months and I suspect they the CPA firms get turned off when I make a follow up call and they learned that I am deaf. Most of them state that they are not hiring now. This contradicts with the Labor of Statistics stating that the job growth for accountants is expected to grow 16% a year each year through 2016. Any suggestions on improving my chances? I live near Orlando, Florida and I am 52 years old. I have valuable skills that would add value to any company that hires me. Please advise.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I have SNHL. I have a CI in one ear and a hearing aide in the other. I speak very well. I do lip read and if the room is quite I can do a conversation. I was nurse before I lost my hearing to the point I needed help. I would love to reenter the job force. Going back to nursing would be good, but maybe unrealistic. I'm in a different state now and plan to attend community college. Should I go for ASL and work in a hospital that way or do nursing school in my new state?? I figure ASL will allow me to work in jobs that require deaf and HOH persons. Any thoughts and opinions?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know someone who's deaf & attend nursing school. I don't know if she'll be able to find a job in her field. I don't think your hearing loss should limit your desire to become a nurse.

      Delete
  19. I am in college to become a social worker, but I've always had minor hearing problems until recently. To counter, I would sit in front of the class, I can take notes without ever looking at the paper, so that I can read the instructor's lips if need be. I work hard and I consider myself pretty bright. However, more recently, my hearing has been getting pretty bad. My Left eardrum ruptured six months ago for some unknown reason and I've barely heard out of it since. Just yesterday my right eardrum ruptured as the result of a severe cold. I literally am at 20% of what I was just one short year ago and that terrifies me. Aside from the fear of losing my hearing so rapidly, I'm scared about my career choice. Can I still be a social worker if I can't hear? I will talk to my Counselor, but that appointment isn't until next Monday. I am semi-fluent in Sign Language, I took three years of it in high school, and I'm only 19 now. Would those language skills help me at all?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You still can be a social worker whether you want to work with hearing or deaf clients. I know plenty of deaf & HoH social workers, but they prefer to work with deaf clients.

      As for ASL, I think it's best to use that language to meet your communication needs if you want to work with deaf people or just for yourself, but that's up to you.

      Delete
    2. I also want to add that, there are hearing aids & cohlear implants that are available to your needs for your career goals.

      Delete
  20. Hi my husband is deaf but before he was working in finance department. After he deaf, he lost his job for almost 2 year...He feel he is now worthless without job...Please help him..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are plenty of tips your husband ought to check out in the blog archives on the right column. Other than that, find an employment agency who may be able to help him find a job.

      Delete
    2. I am new here. I know exactly what your husband is feeling. I got laid and have been looking for work for 3 years now. I, too feel worthless. I have to swallow it when I accept the low paying job just to put foods on table. It barely can support my family and myself. Lot of times, the low paying jobs are generally easy to get, bc nobody want these jobs. I do the best I can. Maybe your husband finds a low paying job and that will make him very marketable for future high paying jobs? I realize the choices of jobs are very limited.

      Delete
  21. Thanks for your post. I have SNHL, with one severe loss on right ear (with use of hearing aid) and a complete loss on the left. It was caused by meningitis as an infant. Over a decade ago, I started taking classes at a local community college and started realizing how far I was behind on knowledge base, so I ended up with three college degrees. I had had passion to be a theatre/film director, but I was approached by a professional director to discouraged me from going that direction. He said to my face that I had no right to direct any plays because of my hearing loss. My passion became nil and my outlook of the future became bleak. I've been bouncing between temp job to temp job ever since. In all of my interviews for permanent jobs, I did came across employers who insisted that a strong "verbal" communication is a must immediately after noticing my hearing aid, and the interview was over before it even began. Every time I chose a career goal, I was discouraged from pursuing them. It's a roadblock in every direction, every year. It's sad, really.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can totally relate to what you’re saying in regards to the job interviews, if I was having a problem hearing the person giving the interview I would tell them that I had a ear infection & it was causing a slight hearing loss & they would always reply with a “I’m sorry” & would speak up so I could hear them, needless to say, I would get the job because of my experience but soon after they would catch on that I had a hearing impairment & was let go because of office down sizing. That happened on 2 separate occasions.

      Delete
  22. Hi, I'm deaf I have hard time right now I been working for data entry for many years and lost job since2009. I wonder is there possibility career medical code field and accounting for deaf people? I been want go school for medical code field and or accounting I heard that not good for deaf people because of new technology no need paper nomore only use on computer screen...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, you sound just like my situation ..losing data entry job in 2011 and not being able to find another job. Yes, I was considering the exact same career possibility that you had mentioned in med coding or accounting. Why is it not good for deaf people? I asked an advisor at a tech college and she said that being deaf or hard of hearing would not get in the way at all. Don't know if she just meant for school or actual on the the job.

      Delete
  23. I have a progressive hearing loss since childhood but I never let it get in my way as far as employment goes, but now that I'm older my hearing loss has gotten to the point where you have to look me in the face in order for me to hear you & that caused a problem for me with my line of work. I worked 13 yrs. as a Medical assistant & in 2006 I had to leave behind the career that I loved because the physicians didn’t have time to deal with someone that couldn’t hear them from the next hallway. The saddest part of all this is that I loved what I did & truly cared about the welfare of my patients.

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    Replies
    1. I am deaf, too. My vision doctor started losing his hearing. He confided in me that he is having problems with his patients who lose patience with him and do not have time to deal with his hearing loss. I suggested him to go to audiologist to get powerful hearing aids. He owns and runs his business. He loses his hearing for no reason, but he suspects it is in eritage and doesn't know anyone in his family that was deaf.
      Saw him again in 2 years, he still won't get hearing aids. Told him if this business means a lot to him and he better get them or he will lose clients. Very sad!

      Delete
  24. Regal Entertainment Group, one of the largest movie theaters chains does hire Deaf people. There are locations in 42 states. It is minimum wage, but it is a job. I hope this comment can help out at least one person :)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Just wanted to give you a bit of my history and thoughts:

    I was born deaf. I've had no problems in finding jobs after high school in the 1980's. I'd just walk in a place I was interested in, ask for application, fill it out and submit it. Without fail, I always got a call for an interview and got the jobs because the employers gave me a chance once they found out I was deaf. It's all about the employers giving US a chance. Many won't. All my deaf friends had jobs, no problems.

    Fast forward to 2010. After being a stay-at-home mom for 15 years, I decided to go back to work. I tried for a year to find a job. Had to search online. Managed to get 1 interview from online and 1 interview from applying an application on paper and in my opinion, the interviews went well!! But I didn't get hired probably due to my deafness. They didn't want to give me a chance despite the great interviews. (what I mean by great interviews is that the communication went well. I lipread and speak fairly well enough to be understood. Asked questions, did all the proper things we should do during an interview)

    Now it's 2013 and I still can't find a job and I'm tired of looking and just about gave up. I am living on my own and am in trouble. I need a job but yet I can't get one like I used to 15 years ago. I've been trying to figure out what happened? What changed? I realized what it is. Technology. Technology changed in that we no longer can go to a company and ask for an application. THIS is what makes it hard for us to find a job. 15 years ago, I think there were less people going in to fill out applications therefore better chances for us deaf people to get a job. Nowadays, everything has to be done online and with that, there's much more competition. Also another problem I think is back then with paper applications, I used to put down "open" when I didn't know what position to apply for. Let them decide. I've got 2 jobs that way. Now, with online applications, you cannot put down 'open' anymore. They require you to put down or pick from their selections.

    I was filling out one for Target. I had no clue what position Target would suit me and would have liked to put down 'open' so they can decide when they meet me. They had various positions that I wasn't sure what they were exactly. I marked them all.

    Another thing that they have added onto these days unlike years ago. Target for example has an assessment questions you have to answer and pass before they even consider looking at your application!!! It was about 50 questions. I passed it but it got me thinking that people who aren't bright will not be able to find jobs like this anymore since they use the assessment questions to weed out certain people.

    So in all, life is harder now in finding a job. I am working with a Voc Rehabilitation but even that isn't going anywhere. I came to them 2 years ago and they still haven't come close to start the progress. I used VRS 20 years ago and they found me a job immediately! Told me to go to an interview and I went and got the job. I moved to another state and this VRS tells me that they don't find me a job but help me find one. None of the VRS counselors know sign language. Perhaps it's my new state that has poor VRS services.

    I'd be happy to take a low-paying job, anything at this point.

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  26. Businesses exist for one reason and one reason only: to make money. No money no business.

    The only way to make money is to do something valuable, do it better and faster or cheaper than the competition.

    No deaf person who provides a valuable service better, faster and cheaper than anyone else will lack for job.

    It's not much easier for hearing. Same principle. Perform or move on. Business isn't charity. You have to earn a great job by doing great work.

    If you cost twice as much to train, to monitor, take twice as long to do everything, no business in the world wants to hire you. Some do out of charity, as a good will gesture but other workers support the extra time and energy required to accommodate special needs.

    Business doesn't owe the deaf or anyone anything. It exists to make a profit for its owners.

    If the owner is deaf it is no different. No profit, no business, no business no job.

    Learn to provide value. Learn to do something better than anyone else. Learn to work hard same as anyone else. Then you will be equal. Then you will succeed.

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  27. I wonder if I bid out the lowest paying illegal farm worker will I get hired? Probably not...

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  28. I was born hearing, learned to speak, have owned my own business and am now HH. I had to learn the language of the Deaf/HH and now use interpreters for certain situations. Despite my ability to speak, the knowledge I possess and what I have to offer, I cannot find work anywhere! Its frustrating, disappointing, and unfair that we in who are Deaf/HH are treated as we are stupid simply because we cannot hear or do not hear as well as others. Often people talk about in front me and fail to understand I can hear, just not well. In addition, I can read lips partially. I love when an employer says to someone else in the room, "she is deaf, can she really do the job...how are we going to talk to her? How will she know what we want her to do?" As much as I believe writing on paper to me is an insult, it is an option if all else fails. The bottom line is this. We, the Deaf/HH can do anything anyone else can do if we try, study and are given the chance. We simply cannot hear! Reality check!

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  29. I have found very little discrimination (maybe I'm lucky!) I am an Environmental Health officer and have had a career in this field for 10 years now, including working overseas. From when I was young I was raised not to expect any special treatment, so during school, university and my work, I put high expectations on myself to be the same as a hearing person. At one point I must admit I was in denial, after refusing my university's assistance with having a note taker for my lecturers. For the most part I had to make do with my lip reading. Sometimes when someone first learns I am hard of hearing, they act and speak differently as if this will help me understand. But eventually they learn I do not need them to do this. I was diagnosed with moderate to severe sensoneurinal hearing loss in both ears at age 4, and have worn hearing aids my whole life. I have not had any other friends or colleagues in the same situation, but hopefully anti discrimination laws in the workplace have come far enough these days that people do not see us as being "less", but rather have something different and unique to offer.

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  30. I've been looking for work for 3 years. Now I realize my hearing is holding me back..I'm being discriminated against because people won't speak up in interviews. What do I do?

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  31. I AM DHIRAJ BATRA I am Physically Handicapped I have some problem in my ears as well as mouth by birth but I will assure that I make a extreme difference – in terms of great performance & work. i am looking for jobs.plz reply me mail dhiraj.sunny4@gmail.com

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