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Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Reasons for Deaf employees being fired


Here are common six factors for firing Deaf employees. All of those are discrimination against deafness. Here are the reasons for their firing:

1. Not able to complete required tasks due to a lack of reasonable accommodation like a fax machine, computer, video call relay, ASL interpreter, or text messaging (which as a mean to communicate with co-workers and managers).

2. Employers are tired of communicating with Deaf employees. Not that Deaf workers can't communicate, but employers do not like to take their time to write down the notes or talk directly to their Deaf employees who read lips.

3. They are fired because they can't hear. Their job descriptions say they must be able to hear well to perform a job. For instance, a couple of years ago, a Deaf lifeguard was fired because she was deaf, and a new policy required all lifeguards to be able to hear in case someone was screaming for help in the water.

4. Conflicts with co-workers. Deaf and hearing co-workers do not get along well. A hearing co-worker lies to their boss about a deaf co-worker for any reason just to get him or her in trouble, and the boss chooses to believe their hearing employee over the deaf worker. During dispute, the employer often takes hearing employee's side instead of deaf employee.

5. Companies do not have enough money to pay their employees and decide to lay off some "unwanted" employees including the one who is deaf. They will keep the ones who are considered the most "qualified".

6. For requesting an ASL interpreter for on-the-job training program.

Any thoughts? Does anyone have similar experience to any of these lists? If anyone has anything else that is not listed above, please post away! I believe there may be more than what is listed here.

https://www.facebook.com/DeafUnemployment
https://deafcantgetjobs.blogspot.com

28 comments:

  1. Cost is one major issue. There is an assumption in a world that is highly dependent on effective and fast communications, the deaf by default cannot compete in the workplace.

    Co-worker issues are where a number of deaf have said they were driven out of jobs, as hearing workers exploited their deafness to make them look bad.

    Obviously business is not interested in deaf issues or culture at all, their only interest is "Can the deaf person do this job, with the minimum or no support, and unaided ?" Time is money.

    I would suggest any deaf turning up with cultural 'demands' for support as an prime opener for an interview has lost the job already. Most deaf I know have no idea how to sell themselves, and a number relied on translators to do it !

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  2. MM wrote: Cost is one major issue. There is an assumption in a world that is highly dependent on effective and fast communications, the deaf by default cannot compete in the workplace.
    False, It does not affect my workplace . The company profit made millions dollar per year. The interpreter for the meeting cost range $40 to $80. Per hour up to 2 hours so meeting four times a year.
    I saw several employee injury due accident lead lost time, production and high insurance. Injured employee cost thousands dollar per year. Go figure out.

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  3. MM wrote: Cost is one major issue. There is an assumption in a world that is highly dependent on effective and fast communications, the deaf by default cannot compete in the workplace.
    False, It does not affect my workplace . The company profit made millions dollar per year. The interpreter for the meeting cost range $40 to $80. Per hour up to 2 hours so meeting four times a year.
    I saw several employee injury due accident lead lost time, production and high insurance. Injured employee cost thousands dollar per year. Go figure out.

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  4. MM, I stopped to read your blog (at the Rim) because you made so many misleading answers about deaf people in USA. I had enough with your crap.

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  5. I appreciate your right to disagree. Everyone is different. The comment was re the UK approaches not the USA ones.

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  6. Hi, My name is Karen and I am deaf. That isn't true. I don't like drama or negative. i have job. I am an Account Administrative Assistant. i have been working there for 1 years. I am very happy and people are nice and treat me well. My boss is nice and patient. we are getting along very well. That's all. if they were fired them maybe they don't good match or not fit for them. We can written on the paper or IM on the computer or getting intepreter for a meeting or important need to did. they were inviting me for my birthday and also events thing. i had learned a lots. I have friends from Hearing. i grew up oral from Peru. i can talk little bit but not much. deaf can go work whatever they want sometime, they didn;t avaible. Be postivie!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is so hilarious! I didn't know someone who has serious English problems could become an Account Administrative Assistant. Next time, try coming up with something a little more believable.

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    2. i am not kidding. im serious. i love job. Account Aministrative means responisable like files order, scan, computer for account different jobs. i got award.

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    3. and also, i can write english they understand and i understand them. we are along very well. they are happy for me.

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    4. Um, she's PERUVIAN..... she's from a SPANISH SPEAKING COUNTRY.... People can converse just fine in Spanish.... people like to hire bilingual folks, and that may be why she has a position in that field.

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    5. Um... Did you realize she's deaf?

      Delete
  7. Another reason: common senses. It's said that we deaf people don't have a common sense. We often are not "in sync" with hearing co-workers, especially during tight deadlines.

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    Replies
    1. That makes sense. Would they fire deaf people because of that?

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    2. because they aren't good job. They should be practice more.

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  8. i suggest you can call or email to DRS they will help you for looking a job like me.

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    Replies
    1. I believe someone who lives in Utopia world would gladly take your advice. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
  9. Maybe the cause is more deep rooted, deaf and hearing need to learn to live together and the education should be geared toward that. being deaf does not mean it has to be us versus them, but it always ends up that way, so the changes have to be learnt at day one, not deaf in isolation until work age and just thrown into the mainstream workforce, it won't and doesn't work. Also changing cultural attitudes has to be addressed, as many aspects tend to make things worse. E.G insisting hearing have to adapt, and the deaf do not. Awareness is and always was one-sided, there was never much onus for deaf to adapt,and many statements insisting they can't and should not anyway.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. The reasons for deaf people being separated physically and emotionally from hearing ones are because of the cultural differences and oppressions. For years, we always have been oppressed by hearing people and forced to be like them. Since you have mentioned that you were deaf, you'd know what it's like to be deaf and have to deal with audism all your life. I don't need to tell you that.

      I do not feel that both sides have to be blamed for the way things are because hearing people do not understand deaf culture and deaf persons do not feel comfortable being around those who have negative attitudes toward deafness. That's just the way the world is.

      Delete
    2. I found this site quite by accident.You are fluent in English. Your use of the comma (For years,) suggests that you have studied English grammar. I am guessing that you have many employment opportunities. I agree that being forced into "audism" is unconscionable.Dr. I. Jordan Kings said that there are many ways of being deaf. Not all deaf people are the same. They have different needs and make different choices. That said, I think that being deaf in America is similar to Americans living in an American military subculture in another country. You can choose to operate within the confines of the subculture for employment and socializing. When you need to step outside the subculture to use hospitals, doctors, lawyers, etc...you can use an interpreter. If, on the other hand, you want to be successful outside in the dominant culture, you have to achieve some level of fluency in the dominant language. It may not be fair, but that's just the way it is. I wish things were different. Most of the time, people think that their culture and their ways are the best. Look at all the negative attitudes toward other cultural groups in America. Regarding employment: it is always about the money! If it costs more in terms of time and money to employ someone, the company will choose someone else.

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    3. A lack of English skills is a lack of success. That's for sure. If you communicate in bad English, hiring employers could view you as stupid (even if you aren't).

      Thank you for bringing up the point; I'm going to write about it later on.

      Oh, absolutely, it's always a matter of time and money in working world. No question.

      Delete
  10. I being deaf consider the hearing "having it easy". You forget the deaf having to struggle to communicate. We deaf have right to have clear communication. Hearing people who has negative attitude are ignorants and plan dumb cuz they always carry misconceptions. No company can fire deaf because they inconvenient cuz we can slap them with violation of equal accessibity. We deaf have right to choose the method of communication and cost of interpreters are irrevelant period. Employers need to be equal opportunity. Denying deaf the right of clear communication is like denying the wheelchair for those who can't walk. STerra, you need to understand that both parties needs to have "two way" street. Denying the deaf the accessibility and firing them are NOT the answer, period. I have worked at same place for 18 years and I have my share of hearing people having negative attitude towards me and I do not tolerate it cuz they can't do whatever they like with me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't make up those reasons for firing Deaf employees; they actually do exist and are true. Those are based on real stories happened to Deaf employees who sued their companies for violating ADA and civil right laws.

      As much as we'd like to believe it shouldn't happen, unfortunately, it does happen a lot. Just because it doesn't affect you doesn't mean it doesn't and won't affect any other Deaf employees.

      Delete
  11. RE: "slap them... cost of interpreters..." A deaf friend, with whom I work, was sadly telling me that she does very well getting interviews. Her English is superb, but she does have some tell-tale deaf accent. She does not need interpreters. During the interview, the employer finds out that she is deaf. She never hears from them again.I experience the same thing with age discrimination. You are correct that your employer can't fire you, but he can decide not to hire more deaf people, as long as he doesn't say it aloud.; so, I sure hope you are a great employee, because your employer will probably base decisions about hiring more deaf employees on you and your performance. Employers can always say that the person who got the job just fit in better, etc.... Now, a potential employer reads the preceding anon. message and thinks, "I don't need this." They can't fire you for being inconvenient or more expensive due to interpreter needs, but they sure as heck can't be forced to hire you, if they are private employers, They don't want inconvenience or extra cost. And, it's their money. One deaf businessman pointed out that until the Deaf community has its own economic base they will have a tough time in the dominant culture's world of business and employment. Again, not fair, and not right. BTW, the cost of interpreters is irrelevant to you because it doesn't come out of your pocket. It is relevant to the employer. Most employers would say it is money well spent, if the employee is a good one.

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  12. Hi
    I am a 47 year old deaf lady, I am also the Director of a Dance Company in the UK. Yes a Dance Company.
    I work as a consultant to lots of companies (and not on deaf issues)on how to run their businesses. I studied sport at university and am a Fellow of the IDTA, the BDFA and an examiner for the UKA.
    I have never been discriminated against in the work place and love my job I feel sorry for those who have but for me it has never been an issue

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  13. Deaf 7-11 manager who was fired awarded $934,000 in disability discrimination suit.

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  14. I have heard all of your commentary, I have seen and experienced many things in my life. I have to live with that. I never successfully gained employment like a full-times job, but I got it though the d.r.s., my father and my brother. However, I did successfully got myself a few part-times job a few time.
    Sadly, we all have our aspect in our lives to deal with it. I know it is a hard stomach to deal it. I have many negative impact on me, and had to dealt with it. Look at the other bright side; something might comes up to you soon or later. Regards. Damian

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