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Saturday, March 16, 2013

What to do with your time while unemployed

Some people are unemployed for two years, some haven't had a job in five plus years. When you are still applying for jobs, think about what employers would look for in job applicants. If they see your resume that says you haven't worked in three years, they may see a red flag. They probably think there's something wrong with you. Why should they hire you if others didn't hire you before? It's the first question that pops in their heads. None of the economic crisis and other factors for being unemployed really matter to them. If you are out of work for more than six months, a very, very few employers would even consider calling you to come in for an interview.
 
The best way to fill in unemployment gap is to volunteer at any type of organizations in your area. You may do it at least once or twice a week if you really don't want to waste your time doing something for free everyday. It probably sounds cliché, but it really helps make employers see that you are enthusiastic about what you do and willing to work hard in your free time. This is one of the biggest keys to increasing your chances of getting more job interviews.

I'm not talking about just putting boxes in the backroom or cleaning the shelves. It's not enough to enhance your skills by doing a simple thing that's significantly too low for your level. It's not important enough to draw employers' attention. Personally, I feel it's completely a waste of time and talent. You may want to show them there are many important things you can do when you are volunteering. You can even develop new skills while you are helping out for free. Think of it as if you are taking a free class or even a training program.

It would make more sense to find a volunteer opportunity that is similar to your experience or educational background. The best website for volunteer or job match is "Idealist" www.idealist.org, which is also available in most countries if you live outside of USA.

If you do prefer not to volunteer because you have your own projects that need your attention, you may want to use them as your activities for your work experience. For example, someone who graduates with a degree in Fashion Design begins working on her own clothing line since she is not yet able to find a job. She puts her fashion design projects on her resume, so that her potential employers could see that she is not sitting on her couch in front of TV, popping popcorns in her mouth all day. Because what? Employers hate laziness! There are other things you can do like writing a book or crafting if you don't volunteer. 

I know I have mentioned in my previous blog that you could start a small company to sell your items or things you want to get rid of. You could brainstorm your ideas to start your own business--whether it's online or outside of the Internet. Nowadays, many people who have lost their jobs had to develop a company of their own to survive this recession. Starting a business and searching for a job are your A and B plans, so that you won't go insane or be worried about your future. Thinking positive will keep you sane at all times.

This is why it's important to keep yourself busy while searching for jobs. Employers will want to know what you're up to while you are unemployed. They need someone with up to date skills. The longer they are unemployed, the less they are needed. It's true.

https://www.facebook.com/DeafUnemployment
https://deafcantgetjobs.blogspot.com

12 comments:

  1. we need deaf unity to make inroads, if we don't DIY the systems isn't going to go out of their way to include or support us.

    The only 'growth' I can see is via 'deaf awareness' business's, and law, however not entirely happy with how it is run in a secular and non-inclusive way. factually deaf cannot sustain a business proposition using only deaf customers,the issue is still deaf are not really trying hard enough to bridge the communication gaps. I know the onus is on us as deaf, but, it a;ways will be, hearing do not need us, we do need them.

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    1. I've never said deaf business owners can only work with deaf customers. I would really encourage deaf people to work with hearing people whether it's in their businesses or at workplace.

      I can't speak for every deaf person, but I know many don't really have any problems working with hearing people. Only one issue hearing people have with their deaf counterparts is communication. THEY are the ones who aren't comfortable to work with us in the first place.

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  2. They don't need us so why they don't hire a deaf people. I am deaf who don't speak with ASL, also I can communicate with them through writing, typing text and email, online chat. I have a limit with reading their lips but it's still perfect for us to connect only writing. This will become a major problem if deaf tell them no I can't write/read, only ASL.

    We already know most of the hearing people don't speak with ASL but they can read and write same as me. Why not?

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    1. That's a good point you got! It's not really that bad if we can't hear as long as we can write and read. What's wrong with that, right? There are always other ways to communicate beside just sign language.

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  3. I don't think you can name many business areas that do not use speech on any regular basis. It isn't how we communicate it is how business does. Probably computer-based business is an good area to exploit for deaf people,although at some point personal interactions must take place. The key as always is to make deaf people literate in the language of the business communities. Stick to ASL/BSL when in that environment, it isn't what business has to do for you, but what you can offer them in the way of skills. If you have those skills then access makes more sense to the employer, no one is going to hire on the basis you are deaf, with or without a law.. It is all down to deaf education systems and training on the job, these are the real priorities, NOT culture. There is no point in insisting employers are aware of that, it is not relevant to the skill or the job. It will just sound like a lecture. If you want to do plumbing no-one is interested in Milan 1880.

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    3. Deaf people can do any business that they feel fit them as long as they have what it takes to make it. Being deaf should not limit them from doing it. Just because we are deaf does not mean we can't talk to hearing people. If they know how to lip read and know how to speak verbally well, then I don't see why not. If they can't hear on the telephone, there's a videophone for that. Thanks to today's technology!

      The only things they must do when doing business, whether it's Internet based or not, is to know how to write properly, read well, interact with hearing people well, and be business-smart.

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  4. Agreed, but you need a skill they can use too. I read somewhere deaf need to be 3 times as smart as hearing just to stand still. Maybe deaf awareness never worked ? It never worked in the UK, it is a shambolic system of biased awareness and in-fighting mostly, deaf politics not loss realisms..... It's a shame for the younger up and coming deaf who see that.... worse if they emulate it.

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    1. Can deaf people legally run their own business in UK if they can't find work?

      As for deaf awareness, they would have to drag these issues all the way to the government who is responsible for its citizens' problems. Obviously, just talking isn't enough, it has to take a lot of action to fight for the same rights as hearing's.

      All we can do is just speak out and figure out what we can do to change that.

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  5. I totally agree that volunteering during periods of unemployment does help. While volunteering gives a person opportunity to expand skills and develop new skills, volunteering also forms connections -- which can be invaluable. Connections in today's economy is essential for new employment. It is challenging to get a new job without "knowing someone", so being able to have connections does help!

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    1. You hit the spot about connections!

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