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Sunday, May 19, 2013

Employers must provide ASL interpreters for the interview!

Yes, you are looking at the title above, "Employers must provide ASL interpreters for the interview!", which is what I've been hearing from the moment this blog started. Surely, ADA law requires employers to accommodate Deaf applicants when they're hired, but let's not forget that they can't be forced to hire them.

There was an article about a case of Deaf applicant suing Toy "R" Us for not providing an ASL interpreter for the group interview. So, why would Toy "R" Us want to pay out of their own pocket for an ASL interpreter if they weren't sure they were going to hire a Deaf applicant? Think about it. They couldn't afford to throw away their money on an expensive ASL interpreter just for the interview. The money issue is completely irrelevant to Deaf applicants because they don't pay. Now, you wonder why the VR services would have to provide ASL interpreters even though the so-called law says it's the actually employers' responsibilities.

Let's just say, for instance, you are considering to hire one of two licensed painters for your new home. One of them is an able-bodied painter, and the other one is without legs from knees down. You realize both of them are equally very good and well-qualified for the painting job. If you hire a disabled painter, you would have to spend more money on a high ladder and other equipment to accommodate that person to make sure he or she can get the job done. On the other hand, if you hire a non-disabled painter, you'd know it wouldn't cost you a thing except your payment for the job done. Now, if you can be honest with yourself, which one would you prefer? I'm gonna let you answer that one for yourself.

The same is true for most companies.

Hiring employers will always say no when you request an ASL interpreter concerning their money...no matter what the law says. They just won't do it...in a subtle way, of course.

This is not to say you would have to stay down and let them get away with discrimination, but employers being burdened with accommodation responsibilities just doesn't work. They know the law requires them to accommodate Deaf employees at their expenses, so they just choose not to hire us. For that reason, it puts more and more Deaf people out of work. 

It's not fair to Deaf applicants because it does not make them look good in job competition. Hiring companies are always baiting the biggest and the best fish they can find. They are not hiring someone because of what they can do for that person, they are hiring someone because of what that person can do for them. It's something that all Deaf applicants need to keep in mind when they are applying for a job. To compete against hearing people in this economy is seriously intense!

The real question is, why couldn't the government have enforced the law that they would be the responsible ones to provide accommodations to all persons with disabilities in workplace? Wouldn't that make job opportunities more accessible to us in the first place?

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12 comments:

  1. It is hysterical when I receive an invitation for an interview and I let the company know that I need an interpreter. Their immediate response is "Well, humm... I didn't know that... Geez, I was not made aware of that!"... Gosh. If I had indicated that on the application, for sure I would have not been considered for an interview!

    I don't know what the best solution is - but you're absolutely right, the companies are not providing the Deaf people an equal playing field. It is really too bad as the companies are potentially losing out the best possible workers they may ever come across.

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    1. Yes, that's the problem. We shouldn't ever expect anything from them when it comes to paying for accommodations. There is a lot of creative ways of communication like writing the notes, using iPad, texting etc. It might make them realize that their deaf candidates can do everything without relying on interpreters that they can't afford. They'll only pay for the work that employees do, and that's it.

      I'd never ask for one because I knew they wouldn't hire me if I did.

      Thank you for your comment!

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  2. Unemployment office in Seattle revenged at me because Vocational Rehabilitation stalked for 6 years. It is HELL. Due to harassment

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  3. Why not to resort to writing on notes back and forth? It doesn't cost a cent!

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    2. I agree. We have to show them that there are millions way of communication instead of relying on paying interpreters.

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    3. I agree. I dislike local pool of interpreters. It may conflict a person invasuon of privacy, ie. The same agency in employment by DVR, the samr agency uses in healthcare. I think video interpreting are the best, non-local, privacy, unless an emergency situation, use local agency. So tetps act like spies. In addition to a doctor officie, an terp told me thatn terps are required to stay with deaf clients. I think thats a lie. If I can communicate and its not really an emergency, i would ask the interpreter to leave the room. One interpreter didnt leave the room, jusy stand behind curtains. Its rude and an invasion of privacy, and voliations of HIPPA, patient confidential and rights to seek treatment or srrvicres

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  4. DVR isnt paying for interpreters at job interview workshop or is it me DVR discriminating me or pay back? Where do DVR get funds from to support your steps to employment? What happens to money not used?

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    1. Hmm, I'm not so sure. They are supposed to pay for ASL interpreters for your job interview. I'd suggest you check your local or state to make sure that you have the rights to be provided interpreters by VR. They pay to accommodate their Deaf clients using the Federal or taxpayers' funds.

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  5. Employers have NO obligation to provide you an interpreter for an interview. This is misinformation, period. Many states have agencies that will provide one for free for an interview. After the hire, if the company has 24 employees or more, an interpreter than must be provided by the company as needed. If the company has less than 24 employees they are under no obligation to hire an interpreter.

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    2. I think your comment is misinformation. I know that companies who have 35 or more employees would be required to provide reasonable accommodations. The number of employees depends on the states.

      And I wasn't referring to the companies that have less than the required number of employees.

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